Burton-Washburn Genealogy

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1 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I4043)
 
2

In 1890, Annie Graham was the first woman to enroll at Elon. She was also responsible for all of the Magnolia trees in Magnolia Cemetery. 
GRAHAM, Mary Annie (I2206)
 
3
Paul’s phone number in 2022: 620-290-1799

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In 2012, Paul David was living in his childhood home in Sublette, as he had been for at least 10 years. Mailing address is P. O. Box 236, Sublette, KS 67877-0236.

Paul was married in 1971 to an Iranian woman from Tehran whose name was Puran A., but they divorced after 7 years of marriage. In 1971 Grandmother Kersey wrote me a letter that saying that Paul and Puran were going to Nebraska to visit Puran’s cousin and family who were getting ready to leave Nebraska and move back to Iran. According to a letter from Grandmother Kersey in November 1973, Paul had been teaching school in Brazil for two years at that point in time. Paul also taught English in Venezuela one year in-between teaching stints in Brazil, where he taught himself Portuguese. In a September 1974 letter, Grandmother Kersey wrote that Paul and Puran were going to get an apartment in Wichita. In a Sept 1976 letter, Grandmother Kersey wrote that Paul was teaching in Brownsville, Texas, and that she thought Puran was probably there with him, since she was due to return from a trip to Iran where she was visiting her family. He also lived in Rio, Brazil, in the late 1970s and into 1980, where he worked for a while as a geologist for Baker Tool Company which was involved in off-shore oil exploration.

He was living in Sublette with his mother, Pauline, at the time of her death in 2004, and he continued to live in the family home there after all the rest of the Miner family was no longer living in Kansas at all, except for his youngest brother, Joe, who, as of 2017, was living in Emporia, Kansas.

Anne and I visited with Paul at his home in Sublette on July 23, 2017, during part of our Great Road Trip across the western states of America during the month of July.

We spent about an hour-and-a-half with Paul, standing outside the house [he never invited us in, probably because of the condition on the inside, judging by how run-down Pauline and Pill’s old two-story home [which he now occupies] looks on the outside. But, that was okay. I enjoyed talking with Paul who is now 72 years old. He still looks and talks like a Kansas “redneck” [he always cultivated that personna] and pretty much looks the part too. He probably hadn’t shaved in a week and he has badly stained teeth from smoking and inadequate dental hygiene, teeth that are in bad need of cleaning. He was wearing a ball cap, short-sleeved bright Hawaiian-motif shirt, and blue jeans. Paul is still sharp-witted and well-informed and enjoyed telling us about some of the local history, including some history about the “Patrick home” that our great-grandfather J. D. Garloch built in Haskell County many years ago. Before we left--him knowing that Anne and I had just left visiting at the Finney County History Museum--Paul gave me a photo album that Gerald L. Garloch made for his father, J. D. Garloch, in 1944. It was a Christmas present from Gerald to his dad that year, a photo record of many of the houses that J. D. Garloch had built in Finney and the surrounding counties! A nice thing for Paul to give me, and which I will treasure--and share digitally with the Finney County History Museum--before giving to our son Ben for safekeeping in the old rolltop desk that used to belong to J. D. Garloch, which Ben now has.
==========

Sherri Farr Miner, Bill’s wife, wrote the following about Paul David on Facebook on July 7, 2022, after his death: “Paul was a private person, set in his ways, and unique, besides brilliant minded. We took a journey along the years of his work, travels, and places he lived. One of his most exciting work was off oil rigs in Africa. When he had worked so many weeks and then had so many weeks off, he would fly into Garden City Airport Kansas, and I would drive to the airport from Sublette Ks. to pick him up. He would throw his duffle bag into the trunk of the car, and climb into the front seat and turn to me and say, "McDonalds!" He would order 8 Big Mac's carefully placed in a paper bag that he would hold on his lap. His hands wrapped around the hot paper bag as if he was holding a little child on his lap, vera protective. "Sherri would you like a Big Mac?" "No Paul, thank you." He would eat two Big Mac's quickly, and save the 6 Big Mac's for later. After he ate the two Big Mac's he would then begin talking to me as he took in the Kansas country side, checking out for any changes that may have happened while he was away. ? When Paul was home for awhile I asked him if he wanted to take a ride to Keith O'Neil's farm, close to Ulysses Ks., I needed to pick up an order of processed chickens, and a turkey, farm fresh eggs. As I filled up the car with Sublette Coop Gas, Paul went in and bought a giant plastic cup of sweet tea. And off we went for a three hour tour, I got lost! All I could see was tall corn stalks, dirt roads, and finally Paul said, "Sherri I am almost finished with my ice tea, I think you are LOST!" I didn't want to spend a night in a corn field because of the movie "Children of the Corn", so we stopped a man and ask "Where are we?" he said, "Where do you want to be?" "At Keith O'Neils Farm" he told Paul how to get there and we found it!!!! When we got back to Sublette, Paul said, "Sherri next time you need to go get something, don't ask me to go!" HA HA HA ? He did go places with me though, he liked exploring the Mexican and Chinese Markets in Garden City with me. He would teach me the printed Mexican words on food items. One thing that Paul and I would do is challenge each other to a Menudo Soup Cooking Challenge and swap our Menudo with each other and say who's we liked the best. I would always say his, and that way he would want to challenge me again, because he would say mine, "I can do better Sherri!" "Okay Paul we will have another Menudo Soup Challenge!" The day we moved to Florida and drove away from Sublette Ks., I gave him a big hug and told him how much we loved him, was one of the hardest moments in my life. I invited him to Florida many times, even offered to buy him a ticket, but he would say, "Gomez the neighbors dog needs me." He loved his neighbors next to the old Miner home. I know Paul is home in heaven, and ruffling up some past memories and will be checking in on me and saying, "@#%$ Sherri, you got a Jeopardy question correct!" I will smile ? He will be closer to us now then he was in Sublette Ks. Heaven is where it shines in your heart ? Always in our hearts with love and sunshine Paul ? Love You”
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On July 8, 2022, Sherri added the following info on Facebook about Paul:
“Paul mainly was a Teacher in Brazil, Miami Fl., Tenn., Texas, Mexico. He was fluent in Spanish and Portuguese.”

Paul David’s grave is in Haskell County Cemetery in Sublette, Kansas.
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Paul’s obit:


Obituary for Paul David Miner
Paul David Miner, 77, died at his home in Sublette on July 6, 2022. The first-born child of Loring “Pill” Miner and Pauline Kersey Miner, Paul was born in Garden City, Kansas on June 22, 1945 while his father was overseas serving in the U.S. Army.

Paul lived in Sublette from infancy until high school graduation in 1963. Several classmates mentioned that Paul’s tutoring, especially algebra, was key to their graduation. He attended Stanford University immediately after high school, but transferred closer to home, graduating from Emporia State Teachers College. Although Paul spent his early and later years in Sublette, he lived and worked many places around the globe as science teacher and oil company chemist. He spoke Spanish and Portuguese. He made his home in many countries and states, including, Venezuela, Mexico, Africa, and Brazil, as well as, Kansas, Florida, Texas, and Tennessee. Paul's favorite job may have been making presentations in schools as an atomic energy employee. He also operated an air filter renewal business in Seneca, Kansas for several years, and was employed during his college-age years as a highway engineer, house painter and Bible salesman. Paul was married once, with divorce after 5 years.

Paul had a lifelong curiosity and was a voracious reader; it sometimes seemed that whatever the topic, he remembered everything he read or heard. He watched Jeopardy every day and would have been a great contestant! Until recent years, Paul gardened rosebushes for his mother to enjoy and a variety of vegetables which he enjoyed sharing with neighbors. A fan of nearly all sports, especially baseball, Paul was an assistant football coach at several high schools where he taught. Paul was not a regular churchgoer but was a member of the United Methodist Church and especially enjoyed the fellowship of working with the Methodist Men preparing the annual Groundhog Supper. He also had read the Bible along with other sacred texts and could reference them with ease. Beneath a somewhat gruff exterior was a kind and giving heart. Paul was especially appalled by the poverty in Brazil and after returning to the states, he continued sending clothing and other goods to orphanages in Brazil.

Paul is survived by his brothers, Oliver “Bill” and his wife, Sherri, of Longwood, FL, and Joe and his wife, Terri, of Emporia, KS; a sister, Mary Miner Embree of Reno, NV; five nieces, two nephews, and numerous great nieces and great nephews.

He is preceded in death by his father in 1978 and mother in 2004.

Cremation was entrusted to Weeks Family Funeral Home and Crematory. A graveside service will be held at a later date and the family requests no flowers.

Memorial contributions may be made payable to the Sublette United Methodist Church, Boy Scouts of America or Girl Scouts of America, Alcoholics Anonymous, Doctors Without Borders, UNICEF or other children’s’ relief, in care of Weeks Family Funeral Home & Crematory, PO Box 1200, Sublette, KS 67877. Condolences may be shared on WeeksFamilyFuneralHome.com.

To send flowers to the family of Paul David Miner, please visit our Heartfelt Sympathies Store. 
MINER, Paul David (I562)
 
4
PINE HALL – John Pershing "J.P." Washburn passed away peacefully on his 90th birthday, Sunday, February 7, 2021.

A graveside service will be held at 2 p.m., on Wednesday, February 10, 2021 at Knollhurst Memorial Gardens with Masonic Rites. Mr. Washburn will lie in state from 2 p.m. until 6 p.m. on Tuesday, February 9, 2021 and from 9 a.m. until 12 p.m. on Wednesday, February 10, 2021 at Colonial Funeral Home for those wishing to sign a register and pay their respects. Social distancing guidelines will be observed and face coverings are requested.

Mr. Washburn was born on February 7, 1931 in Rockingham County to the late Less Walker Washburn and Lillie Bell Morton Washburn. J.P. retired from MacField Industries and also farmed tobacco. He had a passion for fly fishing and spent a lot of time in the river and streams of Kibler Valley in Patrick County, Virginia. He also enjoyed traveling and vacationing with his family. J.P. was a member of the Dan River #129 Masonic Lodge in Madison and also a member of the Scottish Rite of Freemasonry in Greensboro.

In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his wife of nearly sixty-six years, Betty Burton Washburn; three brothers and three sisters.

Survivors include his sons, Johnny D. Washburn, Sr. (Vicki) of Pine Hall and Ronald R. Washburn (Yvonne) of Summerfield; daughter, Ginny W. Bryant (Steven) of Stoneville; two grandsons; six great-granddaughters; one great-grandson and two great-great-grandsons who are soon to be born.

In lieu of flowers, please consider memorial contributions to Pine Hall Presbyterian Church, 1527 Pine Hall Rd., Pine Hall, NC 27042, Mt. Hermon United Methodist Church, 8011 NC 704, Madison, NC 27025 and/or the Dan River #129 Masonic Lodge.

Colonial Funeral Home in Madison is serving the family.

Condolences may be offered at www.colonialfh.net.

Colonial Funeral Home & Chapel, Inc.

127 Ellisboro Road, Madison, NC 27025 
WASHBURN, John Pershing (I1142)
 
5 "1857 newspaper article, Bolivar Missouri News, Daughter of James M. Russell formerly of Greene Co., MO, died in Indian attack on wagon train [in] Northern Nevada." Russell, Harriet E. (I6311)
 
6 "Abstracts of Pittsylvania County, VA, Deeds, 1783-1790," Austin:
Deed Bk 7, 1783-1786, p. 40, Wilson from McDaniel Exor Deed, October 20, 1782 between Ann McDaniel and William McDaniel, Ex'tr and Executor of William McDaniel, the Elder, Dec'd of the County of Halifax, Virginia and John Wilson, Esq'r of P for 1850 pounds Current Money of Virginia, a parcel of land containing 482 acres on the upper Sandy Creek of Dann River it being the Lands the said Willliam McDaniel Dec'd, purchased in his Life Time of Alexander Gordon by Deed dated April 12, 1772 and the said William McDaniel left in his Last will and Testament to be sold by his Executors which said Land agreeable to the Testators will advertise the ab'v Lands and sold to the highest bidder for the af'd consideration December 5, 1779.
s/Ann McDaniel, William McDaniel, Wit: R Williams, William Rice, Cloe McDaniel, Clem't McDaniel, April 15, 1783.

p. 42, McDaniel from Wilson Deed, April 15, 1783 beetween John Wilson of P and Ann McDaniel of Halifax County for 1850 pounds Current Money of Virginia, a parcel of land containing 482 acres on the upper Sandy Creek of Dann River, it being the Land the said John Wilson purchased of the Executors of William McDaniel, Dec'd at Publick Auction which Lands the said McDaniel purchased of Alexander Gordon by Deed dated April 20, 1772.
s/John Wilson, Wit: None, April 15, 1783. 
McDaniel, Clement (I1813)
 
7 "Abstracts of Pittsylvania County, VA, Deeds, 1783-1790," Austin:
Deed Bk 7, 1783-1786, p. 40, Wilson from McDaniel Exor Deed, October 20, 1782 between Ann McDaniel and William McDaniel, Ex'tr and Executor of William McDaniel, the Elder, Dec'd of the County of Halifax, Virginia and John Wilson, Esq'r of P for 1850 pounds Current Money of Virginia, a parcel of land containing 482 acres on the upper Sandy Creek of Dann River it being the Lands the said Willliam McDaniel Dec'd, purchased in his Life Time of Alexander Gordon by Deed dated April 12, 1772 and the said William McDaniel left in his Last will and Testament to be sold by his Executors which said Land agreeable to the Testators will advertise the ab'v Lands and sold to the highest bidder for the af'd consideration December 5, 1779.
s/Ann McDaniel, William McDaniel, Wit: R Williams, William Rice, Cloe McDaniel, Clem't McDaniel, April 15, 1783.

p. 42, McDaniel from Wilson Deed, April 15, 1783 beetween John Wilson of P and Ann McDaniel of Halifax County for 1850 pounds Current Money of Virginia, a parcel of land containing 482 acres on the upper Sandy Creek of Dann River, it being the Land the said John Wilson purchased of the Executors of William McDaniel, Dec'd at Publick Auction which Lands the said McDaniel purchased of Alexander Gordon by Deed dated April 20, 1772.
s/John Wilson, Wit: None, April 15, 1783. 
McDaniel, Chloe (I1388)
 
8 "Abstracts of Pittsylvania County, VA, Deeds, 1783-1790," Austin:
Deed Bk 7, 1783-1786, p. 40, Wilson from McDaniel Exor Deed, October 20, 1782 between Ann McDaniel and William McDaniel, Ex'tr and Executor of William McDaniel, the Elder, Dec'd of the County of Halifax, Virginia and John Wilson, Esq'r of P for 1850 pounds Current Money of Virginia, a parcel of land containing 482 acres on the upper Sandy Creek of Dann River it being the Lands the said Willliam McDaniel Dec'd, purchased in his Life Time of Alexander Gordon by Deed dated April 12, 1772 and the said William McDaniel left in his Last will and Testament to be sold by his Executors which said Land agreeable to the Testators will advertise the ab'v Lands and sold to the highest bidder for the af'd consideration December 5, 1779.
s/Ann McDaniel, William McDaniel, Wit: R Williams, William Rice, Cloe McDaniel, Clem't McDaniel, April 15, 1783.

p. 42, McDaniel from Wilson Deed, April 15, 1783 between John Wilson of P and Ann McDaniel of Halifax County for 1850 pounds Current Money of Virginia, a parcel of land containing 482 acres on the upper Sandy Creek of Dann River, it being the Land the said John Wilson purchased of the Executors of William McDaniel, Dec'd at Publick Auction which Lands the said McDaniel purchased of Alexander Gordon by Deed dated April 20, 1772.
s/John Wilson, Wit: None, April 15, 1783.

Deeds & Wills No. 11, 1780-1820, p. 75, McDaniel's Negro Emancipated: I, Anne McDaniel of P, being conscious that the Doctrine of Christ teacheth us to do unto others as we would they should do to us and having a Negro Woman Slave in my possession named Caroline, I do now set free and Emancipate the said Slave and her increase, and do for myself my Heirs etc resign and relinquish all my right and title to the said Slave Caroline and her increase. Signed with my Seal this 11th day of November 1790.
s/Anne (X) McDaniel; Wit: B. Williams, Jno Call, March 21, 1791.

Pittsylvania Co., VA, wills (Adams), undated, pr. ? January 1795? LWT Anne McDaniel. To my son Joel McDaniel the plantation where I live three years from the first of January next. At the expiration of three years it is to be sold and the money divided among all my children: William, Clement McDaniel, Chloe, James Smith [McDaniel], Collen, Nancy, Polley and Joel.

All the stock and moveable estate to be divided between the five youngest children agreeable to the will of their late father. To my daughter Polly Price the part of such dividend as by the will of their father aforesaid would fall to my son James Smith he being one of the five youngest children having bought his part of the dividend and paid him.

To my son Joel the stock of hogs and use of the horses for three years, then to my son Clement McDaniel.

To my granddaughter Anne Smith McDaniel, daughter of Clement McDaniel, my riding horse.

All the livestock to remain with Joel for three years, then to be divided among all the children.

Appoint son Clement McDaniel executor.

Anne (X) McDaniel

Wit: James McDonald, Absalom McDonald, Abselm Donuled [sic]. Daniel Coleman and Holcott Townes security for the executor. 
Smith, Anne (I1386)
 
9 "Abstracts of Pittsylvania County, VA, Deeds, 1783-1790," Austin:
Deed Bk 7, 1783-1786, p. 458, Burton from Burton Deed, February 22, 1785, between John Burton and Mary his wife of the County of Mecklenburg and John Burton of the County of Cumberland for 400 pounds, a parcel of land on both sides of Banister River containing by estimation 800 acres. Bounded: Jesse Carter's corner, on his dividing line, crossing the river, Hardy's line, William Davis's lines, Joshua Welch's corner in a great Meadow of Cherrystone Creek, crossing the said Meadow.
s/ Jno Burton, Wit: Robt Smith, John Burton junr, Harry Smith, Benjamin Burton, Jesse Burton, Geo Craghead, R Williams, D Burton.

Garrard Co., KY, Deed Bk C p. 129, Jesse Burton of Garrard Co. appoints his true friend Azariah Doty of the same county to recover the estate of Capt. John Burton deceased in the county of Cumberland stat of VA, which is now in the possession of Agnes Burton, the widow and executrix of estate. John Hatcher and Archer Allen securities for the said Doty - 1807.

Ten children are attributed to Jesse and Zepporah. I have not yet documented any of this with primary evidence.

Timeline from Bob Burton of Gainesville:

1820-23: In one deed book, Jesse Burton authorizes Thomas Kennedy to sell his negroes, household furniture, crops and stock to pay Thomas Kennedy what he owes him. No wife signs this but in deed Bk H, p217 is Jesse and wife Zeporah - spelled Zeppora.

1823: Jesse Burton is listed as insolvent in Garrard County, KY Tax List.

11/12/1823: Jesse Burton sells the place where he now lives to Thomas Kennedy - the place adjoins Walter Adams and Samuel McMullins on Long Branch. (Walter Adams is the father of Elizabeth Adams who married William Lear 1819). Recorded in Garrard Co, KY Deed Book H, page 385.

3/29/1824: Kennedy assigned the same land to John Meed Burton and Polly Asberry Burton.

1830: Zeporah Burton (F50-60) appears as head of a family in Garrard Co, KY census, page 244. Also enumerated are F30-40, M20-30, 2F20-30, 2M15-20, F10-15. 
Burton, Jesse (I1936)
 
10 "Abstracts of Pittsylvania County, VA, Deeds, 1783-1790," Austin:
Deed Bk 8, 1787-1790, p. 367, Quinn's Deed from Wier, April 4, 1789 between John Wier and Sally his wife of P and William Quinn of P for 100 pounds, a parcel of land containing by estimation 205 acres. Bounded: Wilson's line, Wilson's spring branch, new line.
s/John Wier, Sally (X) Wier. Wit: Daniel Price, Wm Price, Maraday Price, April 20, 1789.

p. 368, Prewett's Deed from Wier, April 4, 1789 betwen John Wier of P and John Prewitt of P for 15 pounds, a parcel of land containing by estimation 15 acres. Bounded: Rocky Branch, Wilson's spring branch, Wilson's line.
s/John Wier; Wit: Daniel Price, Wm Price, Maraday Price, April 20, 1789.

p. 371, Price's Deed from Adams, January 15, 1789 between George Adams of P and William Price Senr of P for 40 pounds containing 40 acres which Francis Ross purchased of Charles Burton together with the land and plantation that the said Ross formerly lived on containing in the whole 100 acres. Bounded: south side of Sandy Creek, Thomas Deakes line.
s/Geo Adams, Wit: D Price, Robert Price, Maraday Price, April 20, 1789.

p. 376, Price's Deed from Wier, April 4, 1789 between John Wier of P and William Price of P for 50 pounds, a parcel of land containing by estimation 70 acres. Bounded: Rocky branch, Adkerson's corner, Adkerson's line, Burton's former line.
s/John Wier. Wit: Daniel Price, John (X) Pruit, Marady Price, April 20, 1789.

Pittsylvania Co., VA, will, w. 1845, pr. 16 Feb 1846. Children: Salllie Paxton, Stephen, Ann Harper, Betsy Perkins, wife of Joseph Perkins. Children of dec'd son William A. Price, Keziah Sparks, "who now resides in my family." Exec: John W. Paxton, Geo Townes. Wit: Geo D. Johnson, John Ross, R. Hopkins, L. Holbrook. (Gravestone: Aug 27, 1766 - Jan 29, 1846) (Williams, "Wills of Pittsylvania Co., VA, 1820-1880) 
Price, Daniel (I1814)
 
11 "Abstracts of Pittsylvania County, VA, Deeds, 1783-1790," Austin:
Deed Bk 8, 1787-1790, p. 367, Quinn's Deed from Wier, April 4, 1789 between John Wier and Sally his wife of P and William Quinn of P for 100 pounds, a parcel of land containing by estimation 205 acres. Bounded: Wilson's line, Wilson's spring branch, new line.
s/John Wier, Sally (X) Wier. Wit: Daniel Price, Wm Price, Maraday Price, April 20, 1789.

p. 368, Prewett's Deed from Wier, April 4, 1789 betwen John Wier of P and John Prewitt of P for 15 pounds, a parcel of land containing by estimation 15 acres. Bounded: Rocky Branch, Wilson's spring branch, Wilson's line.
s/John Wier; Wit: Daniel Price, Wm Price, Maraday Price, April 20, 1789.

p. 371, Price's Deed from Adams, January 15, 1789 between George Adams of P and William Price Senr of P for 40 pounds containing 40 acres which Francis Ross purchased of Charles Burton together with the land and plantation that the said Ross formerly lived on containing in the whole 100 acres. Bounded: south side of Sandy Creek, Thomas Deakes line.
s/Geo Adams, Wit: D Price, Robert Price, Maraday Price, April 20, 1789.

p. 376, Price's Deed from Wier, April 4, 1789 between John Wier of P and William Price of P for 50 pounds, a parcel of land containing by estimation 70 acres. Bounded: Rocky branch, Adkerson's corner, Adkerson's line, Burton's former line.
s/John Wier. Wit: Daniel Price, John (X) Pruit, Marady Price, April 20, 1789.

Date on marriage bond was ambiguous but close inspection and comparison with contemporary documents indicate a date of 1791, not 1795 as reported in published abstracts of Pittsylvania Co. marriages.

Caswell Co., NC, Deed Bk M, p. 164-5, John Somers of CC to James Burton of same, for $150, 100 A s side Hogan's Cr adj Ware, Bullock, John Middlebrooks. 12 Dec 1801. Wit: Joel McDaniel, Marady Price. [Maraday Price was a 2d cousin of James Burton; Joel McDaniel was a brother-in-law of Maraday Price.]

p.182, James Burton of CC to Joel McDaniel of same, for $371.50, 185.75 A on Hogan's Cr adj Bogges, Stokes. 8 Dec 1801. Wit: Marady Price, John Gunn.

Caswell Co. Will Bk E, p.392, March Court 1808, Capt. Meredy Price executor of will of Rosannah McClarney. [Mother-in-law of Obediah Holloway]

Caswell Co. Will Bk E, p.99, George Burton by act of General Assembly empowered to expose to Publick sale lands on which his father Charles Burton owned--this obligation void if Burton does sell land and distribute proceeds. /s/ George Burton, Maraday Price, Joel McDaniel, J. Grant, John Tennison, Silvs. Stokes. 1 May 1804. (Kendall abstract)

Caswell Co. Deed Bk O, p.30, George Burton of Pittsylvania Co., VA, acting legatee of Charles Burton decd to Luke Palmer of CC, for $900, by virtue of act of General Assembly of NC, 463 A n side Hogan's Cr adj Joel McDaniel, Starkey, Peter Smith, George Humphries old line, Ware; also to include the widow's dower on n side Hogan's Cr, viz the widow Paul relict of Samuel Paul decd and formerly widow & relict of Doctor [Robert] Burton decd. 16 Nov 1804. Wit: Simon Adams, Maraday Price. (Kendall abstract)

Caswell Co. Guardian's accounts, 1814, p.280, Meredith Price [guardian for] Estate of Joel McDaniel. Expenses for William and John McDaniel (exp. for carrying tobacco to Lynchburg)

Caswell Co., Will Bk H, April Court 1817, p.35, Sale property of Meradith Price decd sold 7 Feb 1817...
p. 37 Inv property of Meradith Price decd. Bonds on Charles Keesee, Julius Allen, John Ross, James D. Patton, John and James May, John Mims, Woodlief Hooper, Hugh Stubblefield, William Dodson, David Lay et al.

Caswell Co., NC, Deed Bk S, p.173-5, Div lands of Meredith Price decd to legatees: 1. Pinkney Price 73 A adj Major Price, William Penix; 2. Polly Price 77 A; 3. Washington Price 77 A; 4. David Price 77 A; Major Price 77 A; 6. Meredith Price 77 A; 7. Susannah Price 73 A; 8. Joel Price 76 A; 9. Addison Price 77 A; 10. Nancy Price 84 A; 11. John Price 84 A. 21 Mar 1817. William W. Price relinquishes all claim to said lands. Commrs: Elijah Withers, Benjamin C. West, Jas Burton, John Cobb, Henry Howard; Daniel S. Farley surveyor.

Caswell Co. DB W, p.303: Charles P. Harrison and Susan B. Harrison his wife of Pittsylvania Co., VA, to William Penick adm of Thomas Penick decd of CC, for $328, 73 A on Hogan's Cr, being lot #7 which Susan B. Harrison drew in div land of her father Meredith Price decd. 5 Apr 1826. Wit: John S. Price, H.N. Rofe. Susan acknd deed separate from husband.

Will Bk H, January Court 1818, p.120, Div. of negroes belonging to estate of Meredith Price to legatees: Joel Price, Mrs. Price; to Susannah, John, Polly, Daniel, Meredith, Nancy, Addison, Pinckney, Major, William W., and Washington Price. By Elijah Withers, Dudley Gatewood, Benj. C. West, William Pennick.

Date of death per J.B. Blaylock's collection of cemetery records. Mary and Meredith Price were buried "on the Jamie Mahan Farm near Gatewood in Caswell Co., NC, between Yanceyville and Danville, Va." 
Price, Maraday (Meredith) (I1322)
 
12 "Abstracts of Pittsylvania County, VA, Deeds, 1783-1790," Austin:
Deed Bk 8, 1787-1790, p. 367, Quinn's Deed from Wier, April 4, 1789 between John Wier and Sally his wife of P and William Quinn of P for 100 pounds, a parcel of land containing by estimation 205 acres. Bounded: Wilson's line, Wilson's spring branch, new line.
s/John Wier, Sally (X) Wier. Wit: Daniel Price, Wm Price, Maraday Price, April 20, 1789. 
Burton, Sarah "Sally" (I3015)
 
13 "Abstracts of Pittsylvania County, VA, Deeds, 1783-1790," Austin:
Deed Bk 8, 1787-1790, p. 371, Price's Deed from Adams, January 15, 1789 between George Adams of P and William Price Senr of P for 40 pounds containing 40 acres which Francis Ross purchased of Charles Burton together with the land and plantation that the said Ross formerly lived on containing in the whole 100 acres. Bounded: south side of Sandy Creek, Thomas Deakes line.
s/Geo Adams, Wit: D Price, Robert Price, Maraday Price, April 20, 1789. 
Price, Robert (I1321)
 
14 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3134)
 
15 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I925)
 
16 "Burton Chronicles," at p. 308: "William Burton who married Elizabeth...of Bedford county, and died before 1814 leaving no issue."

From Bob Burton of Gainesville:

9/26/1803: William Burton and Elizabeth his wife sold to Ruel Shrewsbury, for 50 pds, 80 acres on Shockoe Creek, adjacent Eades. Recorded in Bedford Co, VA Deed Book 11, pages 850-2.

9/26/1803: William Burton and Elizabeth his wife sold to James Brown, for 160 pds, 300 acres on Shockoe Creek, adjacent Matthias O'Brian. Recorded in Bedford Co, VA Deed Book 11, page 851-2.

8/25/1807: Alexander Burton, exceutor of William Burton decd, appointed Benjamin Rice (uncle of Alexander Burton-married widow Mary Burton Henry, dau of William Burton and Rebecca Cobbs) my true and lawful attorney, to sign and deliver a bond. Recorded in Bedford Co, VA Deed Book 12, page 248. 
Burton, William (I4661)
 
17 "Dictionary of Alabama biography," by Owen, 1921, at p. 567-68. Buried at Maple Hill cemetery, Huntsville, AL.

Thomas was a physician who pioneered the use of quinine for the treatment of malaria. 
Fearn, Thomas (I673)
 
18 "Dictionary of Alabama biography," by Owen, 1921, at p. 567-68. Buried at Maple Hill cemetery, Huntsville, AL. Shelby, Sallie Bledsoe (I5135)
 
19 "Early settlers of Sangamon County," pp. 263-164. "Born on Roanoke river, Va., and went to Rutherford county, Tenn. He was there married to Frances Hudson, who was born April 10, 1797, in Virginia also." Burton, Edward (I8417)
 
20 "Few counties can present citizens whose services are entitled to more respect, and whose devotion to the welfare of the State, was more sincere than Caswell. Many of her sons have gone to other States, Mississippi, Alabama, and elsewhere, and whose talents have been shown and virtues acknowledged by their adopted country by elevating them to high and distinguished positions.

Marmaduke Williams was one of these. He was born in Caswell County on the 6th of April 1772, married Mrs. Agnes Harris, whose maiden name was Payne. In 1802 elected to the State Senate, and the next year elected to Congress to succeed his brother Robert Williams, who was appointed by Mr. Jefferson, Governor of Mississippi. He remained in Congress until 1809. In 1810 he removed to Alabama, Tuscaloosa County, and was a delegate from that county to the convention which formed the Constitution. In 1832 elected a Judge of Tuscaloosa County. He died on the 29th of Oct. 1850."

Source: Historical Sketches of North Carolina from 1584 to 1851, John H. Wheeler, Compiler (1851) at 78. 
Williams, Marmaduke (I5774)
 
21 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F3937
 
22 "Marriages of Amelia County, Virginia, 1735-1815," by Kathleen Booth Williams, c. 1961, reprinted 2000, at p. 19:

3 December 1781. BURTON, John and Martha Cocke Farley, of Raleigh Parish. Sur. William Craddock. p. B-2.

Husband John Burton accepted legacy from father Stewart Farley's will:

Caswell Co. Will Bk C, p.416, Oct. Court, 1799, Stewart Farley--Will--w. 21 Mar 1798. Wife Mary Farley; son Hezekiah (tract of land I live on); John Burton (negroes Bob, Dick, Sall); Henry Burton; remainder of estate to be sold and divided between Daniel S. Farley, Hezekiah Farley, John Burton, and Henry Burton. Exec: Daniel S. Farley, John Burton, Hez. Farley. Wit: Durrett Richards, Ambrose Arnold. 
Farley, Martha Cocke (I993)
 
23 "North Carolina, Marriages, 1759-1979," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F8FZ-R42 : accessed 04 Aug 2013), John Eastwood and Sally Wilkerson, 09 Apr 1792. Family F2448
 
24 "North Carolina, Marriages, 1759-1979," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F8LV-Y6B : accessed 04 Aug 2013), John Eastwood and Mary Wright, 10 Dec 1834. Family F2705
 
25 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3565)
 
26 "Some Farrar's Island descendants," Holmes, at p. 57, "The will of William Farrar IV of St. James Parish, Goochland Co., dated 11.14.1743, was witnessed by George Payne, Robert Burton, Christian Burton, Mary Womack; sons Thomas and William Farrar exors. The will was proved by Robert Burton, Jr. and Mary Womack, 6.10.1744." UNK, Christian (I168)
 
27 "Still living in 1902 because she filed for a pension as a Confederate widow." Hudson, Julia Ann W. (I6721)
 
28 "Temperance Brown's first husband [was] Thomas Batte, Jr.," p. 95, Holmes, Some Farrar's Island descendants. She was "orphan of John Brown." Brown, Temperance (I6769)
 
29 "The Farrar's Island Family," by Alvahn Holmes, at p. 111, states that this William Farrar migrated to Virginia in 1618 on the Neptune. He was a "subscriber to the Third Charter of the Virginia Company." He married Cecily Jordan, widow of his neighbor, Samuel Jordan. Farrar, William (I98)
 
30 "The Farrar's Island Family," by Alvahn Holmes, at p. 133, will of Colonel William Farrar [II], dated 6 May 1676, proved February 1677/8:

"I, William Farrar, of Henrico, in the P'ish of Varina, doe make and ordaine this my last will and testatment, vizt:

I give and bequeath to my loveing Brother, Capt. John Farrar, two p'cells of land w'ch was formerly laid out and measured by Coloney Thomas Liggon, one p'cell lyeing w'thout Captain Davis' Bottome, containeing about three hundred Acres, the other p'cell within the said Bottome containeing something of two hundred Acres, all w'ch I freely give to my said Brother and the Heirs of his Body lawfully begotten forever, and for want of such issue I give and bequeath the said p'cells of land to my sonnes, Thomas Farrar and John Farrar, and to the heires of their bodyes lawafully begotten and if either of them dye before he have issue, then the survivor to enjoy the s'd land forever. But in the guift of these two p'cells of land to my Brother John Farrar, I make this Caution and Exception, that my Brother John Farrar shall relinquish all the right, title and interest he hath to a p'cell of land I for'ly gave called by the name of Colesfield, or else this bequest to be of no force to him or his.

Item. I give and bequeath to my sonne William Farrar, this neck of land [Farrar's Island] I live on, to him and to the heires of his bodye lawfully begotten forever, and the s'd neck of land is to goe beyond my now dwelling house to a ridge of trees about two hundred yards of [off] ; but if it shall please God that my sonne shall depart this life without issue, then my will and desire is that my sonnes Thomas Farrar and John Farrar have and enjoy the s'd neck of land to them and their heires lawfully begotten forever.

Item. I give and bequeath to my sonnes Thomas Farrar and John Farrar, and the male heirs of their bodyes lawfully begotten, all the land that I have a right and title to w'thout the neck of land already given to my eldest sonne William Farrar, and those two p'cells given to my Brother John Farrar, all the rest I do give to my s'd sonnes Thomas and John, and their heirs as above s'd forever, to be equally divided between them, when they please, after they shall come of age.

I ordaine and appointe my Brother John Farrar and my sonne William Farrar to be Executors of t his my reall estate accord'g to this my last will and testament. In witness hereof I set to my hand and seale this 6th of May 1676. [signed] William Farrar.

Wit: Tho. Daulby, Michael Turpin
Pro die Feb'r 1677/8 coram cur testiam socram'tis probate and recordate. Test: Wm Randolph, Cl. Cur.
[8V97: Henrico County Record, 6 May 1676)" 
Farrar, William (I77)
 
31 "The identity of Captain William Burton of Albemarle with William the son of Robert and Priscilla Burton of Goochland is established by a deed, March 27, 1758 from Priscilla Burton (widow) of Goochland conveying to her son William Burton of Albemarle two negro children. The witnesses to this deed were John Laprade, William Wodlow and Perin Farrar." Harrison, "Burton chronicles of colonial Virginia," p. 285. [This Perrin Farrar was either a nephew or cousin of William’s mother, Priscilla. John Laprade was either the husband of Temperance Farrar or their son. William Wadlow was a neighbor.]

I know I likely do not have the correct order of births of the children in this family.

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89P7-972N?cat=279536 (familysearch.org, last accessed 8/25/2020)

Albemarle Co., VA, Will Bk 2 (1775-1783), p. 360, William Burton, w. 11 Feb 1776, pr. April Court, 1778.

“In the name of god amen, I William Burton of the County of Albemarle being very Sick & weak in body but in perfect memory thanks to god for the Same, do make & ordain this my Last will & Testament in manner & form following Viz., first I Recommend my Soul into the hands of Almighty god, and my body to the ground to be buried in a Christian Like manner in sure & Certain of the Resurrection

“Imprimus I give & bequeath unto my beloved son Jesse Burton all that tract or parcel of land that I purchased of Moses Damron[?] & whereon my son Jesse lately lived, also five negroes named Ned, Lucy, Joe, Jacob, Sylvia.

“It is my will & desire that the Tract of Land whereon I now live be sold by my executors, and the money arising from the Sale to be laid out in the purchase of other Lands, which are to be Equally divided between my sons Robert Burton, John Cobbs Burton, Wm Burton, Philip Farar Burton.

“I lend unto my wife during her natural Life four negroes Toby, Ben, Martin & Queen, and at her death they are to be Equally divided, between my sons Robert, John, William & Philip & my daughters Polly and Susannah.

“And it is my willl & desire that all the Remainder of my Estate Both Real & Personal, be equally divided between my four youngest Sons & my two daughters Polly & Susannah.

“I give unto my daughter Rebecca Thompson, five Shillings sterling.

“It is my desire that all my Just debts be honestly paid.

“It is likewise my desire, that my Estate be kept together, untill my son William arrives to twenty one years of age.

“It is likewise my desire that my executors do renew the suit against the Executors of John Cobbs, decd, for a marriage contract, which is now depending [sic] & it is my desire that what Shall be Recovered from the Said Suit, Shall be Equally divided between my sons Jesse, Robert, John, William & Philip, and my two daughters Polly and Susanna.

“I do also apppoint my two sons Jesse Burton and Robert Burton my executors to this my Last will & Testament, Revoking all other wills by me made, dated this 11th day of february in the year of our Lord 1776. Wm Burton (seal).

“Sealed Signed & Published in presence of us, W. Henry, Richard Perkins, Spencer Nowell

“This Will was proved by the oath of Richard Perkins & Spencer Nowell Witnesses thereto and Ordered to be Recorded, and at Albemarle April Court 1778, on the motion of Jesse Burton an Executor therein named who made Oath according to Law Certificate is granted him for obtaining a probate in due form, whereupon he with Charles Hudson his Security, gave Bond & acknowledge the Same accordingly. Teste John Nicholas”

Albemarle Co. Deed Bk 8, p. 78, 15 Feb 1776, I, William Burton of Albemarle county do give unto George Thompson of the said county my negro Jean if the said Thompson shall fail to recover the money due to himself and his wife from John Cobbs, deceased, by bond, then my promise to him was that he should have so much of my estate as either of my daughters. Witnesses: Polly Burton, John Burton. 
Burton, William (I194)
 
32 "Virginia, Births and Christenings, 1853-1917," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X5DX-Y5M : accessed 26 Jan 2014), Cynthia Jane Ramsey in entry for William Edward Ramsey, 27 Nov 1858. Ramsey, William Edward (I9933)
 
33 "Virginia, Marriages, 1785-1940," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XRQX-ZWT : accessed 26 Jan 2014), David W. Ramsey and Cynthia A. Ramsey, 24 Feb 1858. Groom’s parents were Thomas & Winnie Ramsey. Bride’s parents were Benjamin & Nancy Ramsey. I have not been able to confirm latter record. It appears that either the original bond or the transcription has mistakenly applied Ramsey as her surname. She was likely a Davis. Family F2770
 
34 (Absolem Hinshaw)
Born 1728, Charlemont, County Armagh, Ireland.3
He married Rebecca Haddock, 4-15-1748, Grange, County Tyrone, Northern Ireland.3,29,10
Among the signers (witnesses) of Absolem & Rebecca's marriage certificate were Jesse Hinshaw, Abigail Hinshaw (Jesse's wife), and William Hinshaw.10,105    Rebecca, daughter of John Haydock & Abigale Griffith.a
Absolam and Rebecca were both from Killiman10,105 (Killyiman)29 parish, County Tyrone.10,29,105
Absolem, Rebecca, and family emigrated to North Carolina in 1768.1,41    An entry in the Grange MM minutes of 2-26-1768 shows41
"Absolem Hinshaw acquainted this meeting that he intends removing with his wife and family to America and desires our certificate of removal, and this meeting being informed that Alice Hinshaw also intends removing to America and desires our certificate, this meeting therefore desires Thomas Dawson and Jas Pillar together with Jas Morton and Jonas Shaw to make enquiries concerning the above mentioned Friends and bring the same to the next meeting for approbation."
On 2-5-1768, a similar entry in the minutes for Absolem's cousins William and Jesse was recorded:41
"William Henshaw signified to this meeting that he and his brother Jess, with their families intend to remove from this to America and desire our certificate. Thomas Dawson and Jas Pillar are desired to make the needful enquiry concerning them and return acct. how thay find things to next preparative meeting which is appointed to be held the 26th of 2nd mo."
An entry on 3-11-1768 shows41
"Certificates being drawn for Jess Hinshaw, Absolem Hinshaw and William Hinshaw with their families, also for Alice Hinshaw, the same was signed in this meeting.    Jonah Shaw is desired to record copies of said certificates and deliver the originals to said Friends."
The Grange Monthly Meeting has a later entry showing10
"It Appears that Jesse Hindshaw, Absolem Hindshaw & Willm Hindshaw with their respective families and also Alice Hindshaw removed to America in the year 1768".
Absolem and family settled in North Carolina, on Richland Creek in the Piney Ridge community.167    The Cane Creek MM men's records shows an entry for 5-6-1769:2,10,28
"Absolem Hinshaw received on a certificate".
The women's record shows an entry for the same date:2,10,28
"Rebekah Hinshaw, wife of Absolem, & daughter Elizabeth, received on a certificate from Six Weeks Meeting, Grange, near Charlemount, Ireland, dated 3-13-1768".
Note this certificate date is the same as that of William's.
Great grandson Thomas Hinshaw wrote many letters and memoirs, many of which have survived, and he wrote this about Absalom:b
Great-grandfather Absalom Senior was a weaver in Ireland before the British suppressed the wool and linen trade, and left him without any work.    In getting ready to leave for the New World he took his loom apart and left behind the heavy beams which could be replaced in America.    He packed the reeds and small parts to bring along with him.    As soon as a small home was built on Richland Creek he and Grandfather Absalom Junior re-assembled the loom.    In those days, looms were so valuable as to be mentioned as legacies in wills.
Absalom's loom eventually found its way into the home of great-great grandson Amos Stephen Hinshaw, where it still stands (as of 1982 at least), flax warp in place, although fragile with ageb (see photo link below).
Absolom appears to have died before 1780c as he did not sign the marriage certificate for his son Absolom in 1780,217 as was customary and would have been expected.    A Rebeckah Hinshaw did sign son Absolom's marriage certificate,217 but it it believed that she was the mother of the bride, not Rebecca Haddock Hinshaw;c therefore it's likely that Rebecca Haddock Hinshaw had also died by 1780.c
NOTE: There is some uncertaintly about exactly who were Absolom's parents.    He is shown in this database as son of Thomas Hinshaw & Mary Marshall based upon numerous published genealogies which show them as his parents.    But unfortunately there is little primary-source, hard evidence to confirm or refute this connection.
There is a theory that Absolom might have instead been the son of John Hinshaw #35, i.e. a brother to William Hinshaw #34 and Jesse Hinshaw #54.    This theory is based upon the following:
1. Absolom did travel with William and Jesse in making the ocean voyage from Ireland to North Carolina.
2. The discipline of North Carolina Yearly Meeting forbade the marriage of first cousins, and we know that Absalom, Jr. married a daughter of Jacob Hinshaw, in meeting.    Also Absolom Sr.'s daughter Elisabeth married a son of Jacob Hinshaw.    If their fathers (Absolom Sr. and Jacob) were brothers, these marriages should not have been permitted (theoretically).
3. In a letter dated 8 Mo. 8, 1784 William referred to Absolem as "Brother Absolem".
However it should be noted that William (like other Quakers of his time period) used the word "brother" in a very inexact manner, not always referring to people who were truly a sibling.    For example his letter of 1784 refered to "Brother John Cortney", who (apparently) was actually his brother-in-law, a brother to his first wife, Sarah Courtney.    William's letter, addressed to "friend Thomas Greer", also refers to himself (William) as "thy affectionet friend and Brother".    In a letter dated 20 January 1769 William said "let Jacob Haddock and Joseph Haddock know their two brothers and families is well, to wit Jacob Henshaw and William", who were (as best as is currently known) brothers-in-law, not actually siblings.
Great grandson Thomas Hinshaw #326 kept a written account of some of his life experiences (his original writing is archived in the Rare Manuscript Room of the Perkins Library, Duke University),b and passed-down much oral history to his descendents.    An extensive biography of Thomas Hinshaw #326 was published by grandson Seth Bennett Hinshaw, which included a descendency chart showing Absolem as son of Thomas Hinshaw & Mary Marshall (see the photo link below).
Photo: Absalom Hinshaw weaving loom from a painting by Mary Edith (Woody) Hinshaw b
Photo: Thomas Hinshaw & Mary Marshall descendency chart as handed-down to Thomas & Mary descendents b



SOURCES
1. "The Hinshaw and Henshaw Families", by William Hinshaw; edited by Milo Custer; private printing, Bloomington, Illinois, 1911; Frank I. Miller Co., printers. LDS microfilm number 1402822.
2. "Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy", by William Wade Hinshaw, in many well-stocked libraries.
3. The Church Of Jesus Christ of the Latter Day Saints (LDS) International Genealogical Index (IGI) - Ireland.
10. Myers, Albert Cook. "Immigration of Irish Quakers into Pennsylvania", Swarthmore, PA: 1902; GR929.3748 M99 in a local library.
28. "Hinshaw Chart and List" (1/1/68) by Ralph Edward Pike, from "Family Records of Morgan Co., Ind.", Public Library of Mooresville, Morgan Co., Indiana (LDS microfilm 1509501).
29. "Society of Friends Register Transcripts - Grange Monthly Meeting", microfilm number 0571396 in the LDS Family History Library.
41. A letter written July 5, 1941 by William Wade Hinshaw to Winford C. Hinshaw describing Hinshaw ancestry - submitted by Fontella Hinshaw.
105. A Search Report commissioned from the Ulster Historical Foundation based upon records in the Public Records Office of Norther Ireland.
167. "Friends at Holly Spring" by Seth B. Hinshaw, 1982, The North Carolina Friends Historical Society, Briarpatch Press, Davidson, North Carolina.
217. Society of Friends, Cane Creek MM Records; LDS FHL microfilm #0371251
(a) Contribution from Mike Haydock (haydock@ix.netcom.com).
(b) "Mary Barker Hinshaw, Quaker", by Seth Bennett Hinshaw; Whittier College library.
(c) Conclusion. 
HINSHAW, Absolom (I2765)
 
35 (Adams ed.) Pittsylvania Co., VA, Deed & Wills Bk 11, p. 208-09, w. 27 Feb 1798, Pr. 15 Apr 1799. LWT Benjamin Burnett in perfect health. I give to my wife Frances Burnett during her lifetime or widow-hood, all my estate both real and personal.

At the death of my wife, my estate as follows:

To my three sons Edward, Jeremiah and Thomas, a tract adjoining this, equally divided.

To my son John, the land where I now live, all of this side of Right's branch.

The other piece of land on Sailers Creek to be sold, my debts to be paid out of this and the balance to be equally divided between my two daughters Sally and Polly.

I give my son Thomas his choice of a horse.

To my two sons and two daughters Sally and Poly, Jeremiah and Thomas my stock.

To my daughter Elzy a bed.

To my daughter Polly a bed.

To my daughter Sally a bed.

The judgement I have against Dunn to be divided between all my children only John and Jeremiah I give five pounds more than the rest.

I give my son Godssey [Godfrey] one shilling.

I give my son Burnett [Barnett] Burnett one shilling.

To my son Benjamin one shilling.

Appoint my wife and my son John Burnett executors.

Wit: Abraham (X) Martin, John (X) Martin. 
Burnett, Benjamin (I84)
 
36 (Amelia Co.?) Will of Sarah Burton, 18 August 1781, (Abstract from "The Virginians")
To daughter Martha Ward, Negroes Milly, Janey, Liddy, and Tye
Grandson William Ward.
Daughter Magdalene Walker, Negroes Fanny, little Frank, and Lowrey.
Grandson William Walker.
Granddaughter Mary Walker, a daughter of Warren Walker.
Martha Burton granddaughter of my husband John Burton, deceased, a Negro named Sarah 
Chappell, Sarah (I932)
 
37 (Mary) Emma Rupert was born b: 23 JUN 1862 in
LaClede, Pottawatomie County, Kansas, the daughter of Amos
and Abigail (Atkinson) Rupert. After Clinton Kersey’s death, Mary Emma married again and her last name was Prunty at the time of her death in Idaho in 1928.

The 1900 census for Center, Pottawatomie County, Kansas showed 14-year-old Amus Kersey living with his grandparents, Amus Rupert, 72, and Abby Rupert, 56. The grandson’s birthday was given as Aug 1886 in Kansas. Amus Rupert was born in PA in Oct 1827 and Abby Rupert was born in Ohio in Oct 1843. Abby was listed as having given birth to two children, both still alive in 1900. She and Amos had been married for 39 years.

The 1900 census also showed Joe Kirsey, age 9, listed as a stepson living with David Prunty, 53, and his wife Mary, 37, and their daughter Susa, 3, in Center, Pottawatomie County, Kansas, in the 1900 census. Joe’s birthdate was June 1890, which is good circumstantial evidence that he was the 1-month-old baby that was mentioned when Clinton W. Kersey died in July 1890. He is quite probable that Joe was one of Clinton and Emma Kersey’s four children, who Mary was left with after Clinton’s death.



The 1910 census showed that Amos Kersey, age 25, born in Kansas, was living on a ranch in Emmett, Canyon County, Idaho, with his mother, Mary E. Prunty, age 47, who had been married twice. The census showed that Mary had been born in Ohio, her father had been born in PA and her mother in Ohio. Also living with Mary and her son Amos, were two other of her children: Joe Kersey, 20, and Susie Prunty, 13; both born in Kansas. The census indicated that Mary E. had given birth to 7 children, 5 of whom were still living. The census indicated that Mary’s second marriage had been around 1892, which would have been two years after Clinton Kersey died.

[Note: The 1920 census for Emmett, Gem County, Idaho, shows widow Abigail Rupert, 76, living with her grandson, Amos Kersey, 35. Amos Kersey was single and born in Kansas; his father’s birthplace was listed as Indiana and his mother’s birthplace was listed as Ohio.] 
RUPERT, Mary Emma (I2135)
 
38 (Official cite for will: Halifax County, VA, Will Bk 6, p. 374, 26 Jul 1802)

http://www.gentryjournal.org/archives/jgg0209.htm

Will of Allen GENTRY, signed 21 Dec 1801 and received for probate in Halifax County court.

Allen's will, written 21 Dec 1801, was received for probate at the July 1802 Halifax Co., VA, court. The will reads in part:

"In name of God amen. I, Allen Gentry of Halifax County, and State of Virginia, and in perfect health, and in good memory, thanks be to God. Knowing that it is appointed for all men to die, do make this my last will and testament ...

I give to my wife, Mary Gentry, during her natural life or widowhood, all and singular my estate, real and personal, with all my household goods, and moveable effects, and after her decease or marriage in the manner following:

Item:
I give to my eldest son, Shadrack Gentry, of my estate one negro man named Jack to him and his heirs forever.

Item:
I give and bequeath to my son, Meshack Gentry, one negro man named Toney, to him and his heirs forever.

Item:
I give and bequeath to my daughter Mary Buchanan one negro woman, Lucky, to her and her heirs forever.

Item:
Item: I give to my grandson, Shadrack Gentry, Obednigo's son, one negro man, named Toby, and two negro women named Hanna and Amy, and two negro children, named Hanna and Enos, to him and his heirs forever, and it is my will and desire that Andrew Buchanan, should keep these five negroes with him at his own house, and that he will pay the earnings that they earn to Shadrack, my grandson, and keep them together, after my decease, and my wife Mary's decease, until the heir comes of age and then deliver them and the earnings or the hire they have earned to the said heir.

Item:
I give to my daughter Agnes Whittemore, ten pounds of current money to be raised out of my estate.

Item:
I give and bequeath to my son Obednigo Gentry, ten pounds current money to be raised out of my estate.

Item:
It is my will and desire, and I do leave the rest of my moveable property to be equally divided amongst my children--namely Shadrack Gentry, Meshack Gentry, Obednigo Gentry, Agnes Whittemore and Mary Buchanan.

Item:
Andrew Buchanan and Shadrack Gentry executors." 
Gentry, Allen (I11756)
 
39 ***ATTENTION***
I have decided to attach this William Burton as a POSSIBLE son of this Richard Burton who died in 1779 in Wilkes Co., NC. At present, this is merely speculation, unconfirmed, and based on proximity and continuing research. This family connection should NOT be looked upon as fact, until proven.

1769: Botetourt County, Virginia formed from Augusta and Rockbridge Counties.
1770: Surry Co., NC formed from Rowan.
1772: Fincastle County, Virginia formed from Botetourt County. Extinguished in 1777 when it was divided into Kentucky, Montgomery, and Washington Counties.
1776: Montgomery County, Virginia formed from Fincastle (extinguished), Botetourt, and Pulaski Counties.
1776: Washington County, Virginia formed from Fincastle (extinguished) and Montgomery Counties.
1777: Wilkes Co., NC was formed from Surry and the District of Washington.
1778: Rockingham County, Virginia formed from Augusta County.

John Stapp lived in Surry/Wilkes from about 1771 until 1788. He was the father-in-law of Hutchins Burton, both of whom lived near this William Burton on Greasy Creek in (what became Adair Co.,) Kentucky after 1789. John Stapp was also the father-in-law of Hiram Ballew who was from Burke Co., NC, and whose family lived near the Stapps there.

A William Burton and his possible brother, John, paid personal property taxes in Montgomery Co., VA, in 1782. It was possibly this same William in these VA and KY tax/census records. Hutchins Burton below was a son of Allen & Betsy Bassett Burton. If this William was a son of Wilkes Co. Richard Burton, he and this Hutchins would have been first cousins:

Timelines and tax lists from Bob Burton of Perry, GA, interspersed with other records:

1782: Montgomery Co, VA Personal Property Tax List
Burten, William- 1 white tithe, 2 cattle <-------------------------------------LOOK HERE
Burton, John- 1 white tithe <-------------------------------------------------------------LOOK HERE
Reeves, David- 1 white tithe, 4 horses, 6 cattle
Reeves, George- 1 white tithe, 3 slaves, 40 horses, 18 cattle
6 Stamper families
http://www.newrivernotes.com/va/mont782a.htm

He does not appear in the Montgomery Co. Tax Lists with brother John Burton for 1787, 1788, nor 1789.

1789: Wythe County, Virginia formed from Montgomery and Grayson Counties.

1789: Madison Co, Ky Tax list
Taken by Aaron Lewis
Isaac Burton- WM>16; 4 horses
Samuel Burton- WM>16; 3 horses
William Burton- WM>16; 4 horses <-------------------------------FIRST APEARANCE IN MADISON CO, KY
Charles Debrill- WM>16; 3 blacks; 3 horses
Taken by Michael McNeely
Robert Burton- 2WM>16; 1 black; 4 horses
Abraham Burton- WM>16; 5 horses
Allon Burton- WM>16; 2 horses
Peter Ford- no WM>16, 2 horses
Daniel Ford- WM>16, 1 horse
Taken by Haile Talbot
Joshua Burton (Barton?)- WM>16, 3 horses
David Bruiton- WM>16, 1 horse

1790 Madison Co, Tax list (partial list only)
Taken by John Pitman
George Bruton- WM>16, 4 horses
David Bruton- WM>16, 1 horses
Joshua Barton- WM>16, 3 horses

1791: Madison Co, Ky Tax List
Taken by Aaron Lewis
Samuel Burton- WM>16; 3 horses
Richard Benton- WM>16; 1 horse
Taken by John Adams
Apr 1: Isaac Burton- WM>16; 5 horses
Apr 11: Allin Burton- WM>16; 2 horses
Apr 19: Robert Burton- 2WM>16; 4 horses
Apr 19: Wm Burton- WM>16; 3 horses <---------------------------------------------------LOOK HERE.
Daniel Ford- WM>16; 3 horses
Peter Ford- 6WM>16; 2 horses

6/1/1792: State of Kentucky was created from State of Virginia.

1792: Green Co, KY created from Lincoln and Nelson counties.

1792: Madison Co, Ky Tax List
Taken by John Adams
Allon Burton- WM>21; 2 blacks; 4 horses; 7 cattle
William Burton- WM>21; 3 horses, 12 cattle <----------------------------------------LOOK HERE.
Abraham Burton- WM>21; 1 black; 7 horses; 10 cattle
Robert Burton- WM>16; WM16-21; 3 blacks; 2 horses; 6 cattle
Isaac Burton- WM>21; 5 horses, 10 cattle
John Ford- WM>21; 4 horses; 13 cattle
Peter Ford- 150 acres; WM>21; WM16-21; 7 horses; 22 cattle
Taken by Wm Caperton
Saml Burton- 140 acres; WM>21; 1 black; 3 horses; 12 cattle
Rich Benton- WM>21; 1 horse; 6 cattle
Joshua Barton- 100 acres; WM>21; 4 horses; 18 cattle
Taken by Andrew Kennedy
George Burton- WM>21; 3 horses, 6 cattle
Charles Debrell- WM>21; 4 blacks; 5 horses; 18 cattle
John Denham- WM>21; 3 horses, 2 cattle

1793: Madison Co, Ky Tax List (partial list only)
Middle District, taken by Andrew Kennedy
Sep 3 - Abraham Burton- WM>21; 2 blacks; 8 horses; 11 cattle
Sep 14: Isaac Burton- WM>21; 6 horses; 14 cattle
David Bruton- WM>21; 2 horses; 6 cattle
Sep 14: Sherrod Burton- WM>21; 1 horse; 3 cattle
Sep 14: Robert Burton- WM>21; 3 blacks; 3 horses; 6 cattle
Peter Ford- WM>21; 6 horses; 21 cattle
Daniel Ford- WM>21; 3 horses; 2 cattle

1794: Madison Co, Ky Tax List
Middle District, taken by Andrew Kennedy
May 6
Isaac Burton- WM>21; 6 horses; 11 cattle
Abraham Burton- WM>21; 2 blacks; 7 horses, 14 cattle
David Burton- WM>21; 3 horses; 4 cattle
May 28
Charles Debrill- WM>21; 3 blacks; 4 horses; 13 cattle; 400 acres in Madison Co, Ky; 300 acres in
Green Co, Ky; 400 acres in Green Co, Ky
June 2:
Sherrod Burton- WM>21; 2 horses, 4 cattle
Robert Burton- WM>21; 3 blacks; 3 horses, 6 cattle
Peter Ford- WM>21; 4 horses, 13 cattle; 212 acres
500 acres
Daniel Ford- WM>21; 1 horse; 86 acres
Taken by Wm. Caperton
4/19: Samuel Burton- WM>21; 2 blacks; 3 horses; 11 cattle; 140 acres
Taken by John Adams
6/16: William Burton- WM>21; 6 horses; 6 cattle <--------------------------------------------LOOK HERE.

It is possibly this William Burton who was the father of Polly Burton who married Alexander West in Madison Co., KY:

"November 7th day 1795, Sir Mr Wiliam [sic] [?] files to grant Alexander West licens to mary [sic] my daughter Poley Burten this given under our hands in the presents of these William Lee, Solomon Turpen. Wiliam Burton, mary burton"

1795: Madison Co, KY Tax List
Taken by John Adams
5/20: William Burton- WM>21; WM16-21; 4 horses; 6 cattle <-------------------------LOOK HERE.
James Barton- WM>21; 3 horses
Taken by ???
Jun 25:
Abram Burton- 120 acres on Paint Lick Creek in Madison Co, Ky
Charles Debrill- "right in Boaz Ford"; 400 acres on Green River in Green Co, Ky
"right in Wm. Perkins"; 400 acres on Otter Creek in Madison Co, Ky
"right in Wm. Perkins"; 5,000 acres on Licking Creek in Clark Co, Ky
Peter Fourd- 500 acres on Muddy Creek in Madison Co, Ky
112 acres on Paint Lick Creek in Madison Co, Ky
Daniel Ford- 50 acres on Paint Lick Creek in Madison Co, Ky
Taken by Wm Caperton
Richard Benton- 35 acres on Otter Creek; WM>21; 2 horses; 5 cattle
James Barton- WM>21; 5 horses
Samuel Burton- 140 acres on Otter Creek; WM>21; 2 blacks; 4 horses; 10 cattle
Taken by ???
June 25
William Burton (Bunton?)- WM>21; WM16-21; 6 horses; 21 cattle
David Bruden- WM>21; 2 horses; 6 cattle
Isaac Burton- WM>21; 6 horses; 14 cattle
Sherod Burton- WM>21; 2 horses, 6 cattle
Robert Burton- WM>21; 3 blacks; 1 horse; 6 cattle
Abram Burton- WM>21; 4 blacks; 9 horses; 9 cattle
Charles Debrill- no personal property assessed
Peter Ford- no WM>21; 4 horses; 16 cattle
Daniel Ford- WM>21; 4 horses

1795: Green Co, KY Tax List
Very blurry and difficult to read

1796: Garrard Co created from Madison/Lincoln/Mercer counties. Paint Lick Creek is the dividing line between Garrard and Madison counties.

1796: Madison Co, Ky Tax List
Taken by Robert Brank
William Bunton- WM>21; WM16-21; 7 horses; 20 cattle
Robert Burton- WM>21; 4 blacks, 2 horses; 12 cattle
Abram Burton- 60 acres on Paint Lick Creek entered by Wm. Kirtley; WM>21; 2 blacks; 10 horses; 9
cattle;
Sherod Burton- WM>21; 2 horses; 7 cattle
David Bruton- WM>21; 3 horses; 7 cattle
May 11
Charles Dibrell- WM>21; 3 blacks; 7 horses; 8 cattle [last entry in Madison Co]
July 22
Isaac Burton- 75 acres on Paint Lick Creek; WM>21; 6 horses; 14 cattle
Peter Ford- 212 acres on Paint Lick Creek entered by John Cook; no WM>21; 3 horses; 11 cattle
250 acres on Muddy Creek entered by Peter Gavin
Daniel Ford- 85 acres on Paint Lick Creek; WM>21; 3 horses; 11 cattle
250 acres on Muddy Creek entered by Peter Gaven
Taken by Wm Caperton
James Bartin- WM>21; 3 horses; 3 cattle
Samuel Burton- 140 acres on Otter Creek entered by John Holly; WM>21; 1 black; 5 horses; 10 cattle
Taken by Michael McNeely
Apr 21: William Burton- 14 acres on Paint Lick Creek entered by Wm. Kirtley; WM>21; WM16-21;
4 horses; 9 cattle <----------------------------------------------LOOK HERE.
May 13: James Barton- WM>21; 5 horses; 4 cattle

1796: Green Co, KY Tax List
Very blurry and difficult to read

1781-1844 MARRIAGE RECORDS OF MADISON COUNTY, KENTUCKY
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cramsey/madco_b.html
NAME SPOUSE PG MO DY YR
Burton, Sarah Barnes, James 69 May 09 1797
James BARNES m. Sarah BURTON, Madison Co. bond.....1797 (no date in Vockery), return 9 May 1797. Bondsman: William Burton.

1797: Madison Co, Ky Tax List
Taken by John Pace
Richard Benton- WM>16; 3 horses
Robert Benton- WM>16; 2 horses
Taken by Saml Fox
Davd Burton- WM>16; 2 horses
Saml Burton- 140 acres on Otter Creek; WM>16; 1 black; 7 horses
Taken by Robt Brank
Wm Bunton- WM>21; WM16-21; 5 horses
William Burton- WM>21; 1 horse <---------------------------LAST APPEARANCE IN MADISON CO, KY.
Robert Burton- WM>21; 2 blacks; 3 horses
Abraham Burton- 130 acres on Paint Lick Creek entered by Elijah Kirtley; WM>21; 3 blacks; 7 horses
Isaac Burton- 100 acres on Paint Lick Creek; 1 black; 5 horses
Peter Ford- 250 acres on Muddy Creek entered by Peter Garrant; WM>21; 3 horses
232 acres on Paint Lick Creek entered by Green Clay
Daniel Ford- 89 acres on Paint Lick Creek entered by Phillip Hammond; WM>21; 2 horses
250 acres on Muddy Creek entered by Peter Garrant

1797: Green Co, KY Tax List
Very blurry and difficult to read

1798 Madison Co, Ky
Tax book lost

1798: Green Co, KY Tax List
Tax book lost

1799: Green Co, KY Tax List
District #3
Burton, Hutchins-owns no land
District #4
Burton, William-owns no land

1800: Green Co, KY Tax List
South side of Green River
Burton, Joseph-owns 100 acres on Green River
Burton, Hutchins-owns no land
Burton, William-owns no land

1801: Green Co, KY Tax List
South side of Green River
Burton, Joseph-150+100 acres on Green River
Burton, Wm-owns no land
Burton, Hutchins-100 acres on Green River
Burton, Thos-180 acres on _____ Creek

1802-Adair Co, KY was created from the southern part of Green Co, KY.
_____Wm Burton-1 horse
_____Hutchins Burton-100 acres on Greasey Creek, 1 black
_____Major Burton-1 horse

1803-Wm Burton-male over 21, M16-21, 2 horses
_____Hutchins Burton-140 acres on Grees Creek, male over 21, 3 horses

1804-Wm Burton-male over 21, 2 horses
_____Huchins Burton-100 acres on Greesy Creek, male over 21, 3 horses

1805-Wm Burton-male over 21, 1 horse
_____Hutchen Burton-100 acres on Greasy Creek, male over 21, 1 horse

1806-Wm Burton-male over 21, 2 horses
_____Hutchen Burton-100 acres on Greasy Creek, male over 21, 4 horses

1807-Wm Berton-male over 21, 1 horse
_____Huchen Berton-100 acres on Greasy Creek, male over 21, 2 horses

1808-East Part of County
_____Hutcherson Burton-100 acres in Pulasky Co on Farebush Creek, male over 21, 1 horse
_____Major Burton-male over 21, 1 horse
_____William Burton-male over 21

1809-Hutcherson Burton-100 acres on Greasy Creek, male over 21, 2 horses
_____William Burton-56 acres on Greasy Creek, male over 21, 2 horses
_____Major Burton-male over 21, 1 horse

1810-William Burton-56 acres on Greasy Creek, male over 21, 3 horses
_____Hutchen Burton-117 acres on Greasy Creek, male over 21, 3 horses
_____Major Burton-male over 21

[John Stapp also owned land on Greasy Creek; he was Hutchins' father-in-law]

1810: Huchin Burton (M26-45) appears as head of a family in Adair Co, KY census, page 016. Also enumerated are F16-26, 2M<10, 3F<10. Richard Burton (M16-26) appears on page 017. William Burton (M>45) appears on page 015 as well as Major Burton (M26-44), 1M<10, 1F<10, 1F26-44.

Adair Co., KY tax lists:
1811-William Burton-White male (WM)over 21, 2 horses
_____Hutchen Burton-183 acres on Greasy Creek, WM>21, 2 horses

1812-Hutchen Burton-180 acres on Greasy Creek, WM>21, 3 horses

1813-Major Berton-M>21
_____Hutchin Burton-180 acres on Greasy Creek, WM>21, 4 horses
_____Wm Burton-WM>21, 2 horses

1814-Major Burton-WM>21
_____Wm Burton-WM>21, 2 horses
_____Hutcheon Burton-183 acres on Greasy Creek, WM>21, 5 horses

Adair Co., KY, Will Bk B, p. 131, Will of William Burton, signed 2 Aug 1814, probated 5 Sep 1814. My wife: Mary. Witnesses: Hiram Ballew and Huchin Burton.

Will transcribed by Bob Burton of Perry, GA:
Adair County, KY Will Book B, pg 6 & 131, 1814: The last will and testament of William Burton of the County of Adair and State of Kentucky, who died & deceased the second day of August 1814, which said will being made verbally by sd William on his death bed fore or five days before his death before Hiram Ballew & Huchin Burton of the county and state aforesaid, they the sd Hiram and Huchin considering the said William at the time of making sd verbal will to be of sound mind and disposing memory, requested that all of his goods, chattles and all of his estate of....to be disposed of in the following manner to wit: Item 1st, that all of my estate that my wife, Mary Burton, choose to keep for her own use, shall be reserved to her in its present state and all that remains of said estate to be sold at twelve month credit, the money to be collected and applied soly to the use of said Mary, as she may stand in need of it during her life, done in presents of us.
Hiram Ballew September 3, 1814
Huchin Burton
Partly proven by Huchin Burton on September 5, 1814.
Fully proven by Hiram Ballew on November 8, 1814.

9/5/1814: An instrument of writing was produced in Court, purporting to contain the noncupative will of William Burton, decd, which on motion of Mary Burton, widow and relict of said decd, was partly proved by the oath of Hutchin Burton, one of the witnesses thereto, to be the noncupative will of said decd & is ordered to be certified. Recorded in Adair Co, KY Court Orders Book B, page 469.

11/8/1814: The noncupative will of William Burton, decd, partly proved at a former term of this court was fully proven by the oath of Hiram Bellow and ordered to be recorded. Recorded in Adair Co, KY Court Orders Book B, page 480.

Mary Burton paid tax in Adair Co. 1815.

The children attributed to this William are also tentatively speculated, unconfirmed at this time, and based on proximity and continuing research (as per connection to Richard above!). 
Burton, William (I7510)
 
40 ***ATTENTION***
I have decided to attach this William Burton as a POSSIBLE son of this Richard Burton who died in 1779 in Wilkes Co., NC. At present, this is merely speculation, unconfirmed, and based on proximity and continuing research. This family connection should NOT be looked upon as fact, until proven.

The children of this Richard Burton have not all been identified as he died intestate. Research continues.

1738: Augusta County, Virginia formed from Orange County.

Goochland Co., Deed Bk 3, p. 260, Deed 26 Nov 1739 Nowel Burton and Judith his wife of St. James Parish, Goochland Co., planter, to Robert Bernard of Kingston Parish, Gloucester Co., Gent., for 80 lbs, 265 acres on south side of Willis River, bounded by the river, Reedy Branch, Soakarse Run; being part of a grant of 400 acres to said Burton 28 January 1733; with all houses, etc. Wit: Step'n Bedford, James Daniel, Rich'd Burton, Robert Burton. Signed: Nowel Burton, Judith (JB.) Burton. Recorded 19 Feb 1739.

p. 542, Deed 16 March 1741, John Scruggs of Goochland Co., son of Richard Scruggs of New Kent Co., to Robert Burton, the younger, son of Nowel Burton of Goochland Co., for 20 lbs, 200 acres on west side of Willis River, bounded by Robert Bernard, William Mayo, William Meginnis, Joseph Dabbs. Said land is upper 200 acres of 400 acres conveyed to Scruggs by Wm Mayo by deed 12 January last past; with all houses, etc. Wit: Rich'd Burton, William Hunt Allen, Fra. (X) Hill, Jos. Dabbs. Signed: John (X) Scruggs. Recorded 18 May 1742.

Goochland OB 6, p.86, At a Court held for Goochland County the Third Tuesday in July being the Sixteenth day of the month Anno domini 1745. Present. George Carrington, Thomas Turpin, Arthur Hopkins, John Smith, John Harris Gent. Justices.

1746: Johnston Co., NC was formed from Craven Co. Orange Co. was formed in 1752 from Johnston, Bladen, and Granville.

Burtons Deed to Burton. Nowel Burton acknowledges a Deed with the Livery of Seizin & Receit endors'd from himself to Richd. Burton to be his Acts and Deeds which are ordered to be recorded.

Cumberland Co., VA, Deed Bk I, p. 11, June 26, 1749 from Nowel Burton and Richard Burton of C, to William Bernard of C, for 110 lbs, a certain tract of land about 140 acres, being part of a tract of land patented to said Nowel Burton on Jan. 13, 1733, and conveyed to Richard Burton by the said Nowel. Signed-Nowel Burton, Richard Burton. Wit: John Flemming Jr., John Bowden, Francis (his X mark) Meguier. Recorded June 26, 1749.

This record is possibly this Richard, based on his probable age, although the Marrs eventually settled in Rockingham Co., NC, near Guilford Co. Richard Burton (first cousin of this Richard):

Cumberland Co. OB, 1749-52, p. 76, Gideon Marr vs Richard Burton, 25 June 1750, trespass, assault and Battery, William Johnson bail.

1753: Bedford County, Virginia formed from Albemarle and Lunenburg Counties.
1753: Rowan Co., NC was formed from Anson.

It is possible that it was this Richard Burton who allegedly married a Mary [or Mary Ann] Pleasants. There is no proof of any marriages for this Richard. Richard and Ann Burton sold land in 1751 in Augusta Co., VA, and dower was relinquished in 1762 and 1763 Johnston Co., NC, deeds also by a wife named Ann. Richard's son John was not known to have a middle name when he lived in North Carolina and it is unclear why or when he picked one up. Research continues.

Augusta Co., VA, Deed Bk 10, p. 209, April 17, 1761, Sampson Matthews from Richard BURTON and Ann, of Cumberland County, North Carolina, 47#, 400 acres on James River. [Matthews sold this land a month later]

From a letter written by Dr. Philip Burton to Hansel Haycox in 1998:

"Based on my own former efforts and what I seemed to have learned from them, I am convinced (until some new evidence requires changing conviction) Richard Burton of Wilkes County, NC was the oldest son of my progenitor, Noel (I) and wife Judith Allen. That Richard was by 1732 collecting bounty in Goochland Co., VA. Since this was by "gun," I assume his age may be as low as 12 years. In calls for "road work" during the latter half of the 1730s he is associated with Noel. In early 1740s Noel Burton and Judith deeded land Noel had patented in 1735 to Richard and to his brother Josiah. In 1750, Richard sold this land. This is recorded in the brand new Cumberland County cut from Goochland in 1749. Thereafter, Richard became an almost full time litigant in Cumberland Courts (I should have noted Noel's and Richard's signatures were on the land transaction but the wife's signature was mutilated to point it could not be read). Mr. Garten some years ago got a copy of this record and sent me a copy of his. Richard in these court matters was sometimes there with some of his brothers. The Court shows, minutes that is, he is finally reported as not in the County but in "the Province of Carolina."

From Marj Barron:
"26 Aug 1760 JOSIAH BURTON, plt. against William Johns, def. In case the def. saith the plt. ought not maintain his action because at the time of the contract aforesaid the plt. did take an order & judgment upon RICHARD BURTON RESIDING IN THE GOVERNMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA for a greater sum of money that was then due to this def. from RICHARD BURTON and they agreed to pay if RICHARD BURTON should owe the debt and pay the plt. it......Cumberland Co, VA OB 1756-62, 244
(Nov 1759 Hutchins Burton had sued this same William Johns.)"

Johnston Co., NC, Deed Bk Tr-1:92. 17 Dec 1762. George River? [Rives?] Jo Co, Planter to Robert Grady (cng) 11 # 17 s 3 pence Va. money, 150 A in Jo Co on S?S Nuse riv beg on the SS of Nuse Riv at Wm. Humpyrs cor pine then W along sd line of marked trees to another pin [sic]. N along marked trees to the Riv then down the riv to 1st sta...& is part of land granted by Granville deed to John Bedso? the 5 Feb 1760 & by him sd John Bedso conveyed to sd George Reaves & by him sd Reaves to sd Gardey...houses, yards, orchards, etc. Wit: Richard Burton, Thos. Harrel? July Ct 1763 Ackd. Test: Robt Rowan CC.

The following case further proves existence of a son named Richard, who is not included in Nowel's will three years later:

Lunenburg Co., VA, Ct order book 9, p. 89-90, July 14, 1763 Court:

At a Court held on Jul 14, 1763 for the examination of Noel Burton on suspicion of his feloniously counterfeiting sundry Treasury Notes of Virginia, knowing the same to be bad.

Present, Matthew Marable, Edmund Taylor, Daniel Cargill, Henry Delony, and John Camp, Gent. Justicies.

The Prisoner being set to the bar and being asked if he was guilty, said he was not guilty, whereupon David Garland, John Speed Jr, and Samuel Young, being examined as witnesses for the King against sd Noel Burton, is guilty of passing bad money, but that he did not know the same to be bad, and ordered that the sd Burton, of the charges afd, be acquitted, upon the deposition of his son, Richard Burton. Memo. that the sd Noel Burton made oath that he had the money aft of his son, Benjamin Burton. Signed-Matthew Marable.

Johnston Co., NC, Deed Bk D-1:30, 15 Oct 1763 Richard Burton, Jo Co to Samuel Peek, Buckingham Co., VA, 213 # proc of NC, 314 A in Jo Co, the plantation whereon said Burton now lives beg at Wm. Reeves cor red oak on the bank of Neuse riv, running thence on his line S 23 1/2 deg. W crossing Ellobies cr several times 98 p to his corner pine; S 23 1/2 W160p to a corner pine; S 65 E210p to a pine; N24 E184p crossing Gut several times to a blazed white oak on Neuse Riv, just about the mouth of sd Gut; up sd Riv by several meanders to 1st sta...houses, orchard, etc. Ann Burton wife to Richard Burton examined privately by Lod. Tanner Esq. Wit: John Alston, Thomas Webb, Wm. Bradford.

D-1:173, 1 May 1764 George Keith, Granville Planter to George Reeves, Jo Co planter, 33 # ster. money of England, 150 A in Jo Co on Newlight Cr & runs as follows....Wit: Richard Burton, Thos Ray, James Mathus.

1769: Botetourt County, Virginia formed from Augusta and Rockbridge Counties.
1770: Surry Co., NC formed from Rowan.
1772: Fincastle County, Virginia formed from Botetourt County. Extinguished in 1777 when it was divided into Kentucky, Montgomery, and Washington Counties.

"5, Early adventurers on the Western waters," p. 23, (Kegley):
Fincastle & Montgomery Co. surveys from Plat Bk A, Dec. 22, 1774, Richard Burton, 260 acres on the east side of the New River, beginning at the mouth of a gully on the river bank where the Carolina line intersects with the river.

1776: Montgomery County, Virginia formed from Fincastle (extinguished), Botetourt, and Pulaski Counties.
1776: Washington County, Virginia formed from Fincastle (extinguished) and Montgomery Counties.
1777: Wilkes Co., NC was formed from Surry and the District of Washington.
1778: Rockingham County, Virginia formed from Augusta County.

Wilkes Co., NC, Will Bk 1, p. 26, 8 June 1779. Administration Bond--John Burton, admr Richard Burton, dec'd 10,000 pounds; Andrew Baker & John Baker, bondsmen. [Richard Burton dyed without making a Will...John Burton, oldest son of Richard Burton...admr.]

Wilkes Co. WB 1, p. 39, March Term 1780
Inventory of Richard Burton
4 Negroes
1 horse
4 hed of cattle
2 Beds
2 Pots, Some pewter
1 Plow, 2 axes & 3 hoes

By me, John Burton Administrator
Returned to Wilkes Court
March Session 1780

1789: Wythe County, Virginia formed from Montgomery and Grayson Counties.

1799: Ashe Co., NC formed from Wilkes. Watauga was formed from Ashe, Wilkes, Caldwell & Yancey in 1849. Alleghany was formed from Ashe in 1859.

The estate sale of Jonathan Stamper implies that there were at least 2 other sons or grandsons (Robert and Jonathan):

Wilkes Co., NC, Will bk 1 (1778-1799), p. 519, July term 1799, Acct Sale Estate Jonathan Stamper, Sr, decd held 4th & 5th June 1799; Purchasers Jesse Stamper (1 negro woman), Jacob Stamper (1 negro woman), John Burton, Jesse Toliver, Moses Tolliver, William Reavis, Reuben Parks, Joel Stamper, Robert BURTON, George Reeves, David Hickerson, Jacob Lyon, Jesse Alexander, Jonathan BURTON, Jonathan Stamper, James Stamper, Hezekiah Barker, George Lewis, Henry Johnson, Jos. Hammon, Willis Alexander, John Townzen, Owen Hall, Thomas Baker, William Reynolds. Amt 354:2:5 s/ Jonathan Stamper, Jesse Stamper, adms. 
Burton, Richard (I3346)
 
41 ...Continued from “The Macon Plantations” posted oonline 19Dec2011 by William Arnold



The Second Macon Owner, William Macon

When Gideon died in 1702, Macon Island and the Mount Prospect Plantation, passed to his second oldest son, William, (1694 to 1773). His oldest son was Gideon Jr (1682 to 1761), according to the St. Peters Parish records of New Kent Co.. Apparently William inherited Macon Island, but Gideon Jr. seems to have inherited the land patents. Gideon Sr. had 5 land patents on record, between 1694 and 1701.

Two were in New Kent Co., One was, “On April 12, 1694, 155ac and 4 persons,“it being the Island on the North East side of the main run of Chickahominy swamp at the wading place near Meradays plantation”, patent 8, page 357 This is the only record I found for Gideon buying an Island in New Kent Co. However, it may have been another Island.

The second, in New Kent Co. was on Nov.7 1700, “standing on the fork of Chickahominy river, at the mouth of the said fork, and where the swamp of the said river ends”.

There were two in King and Queen Co., both on April 25 1701. "One was, in the Pamunkey neck, on the east side of Pampatike swamp. Beg.g &c. In the head line of his 425 acres, parcel of Pullams patent”.

The second one was “in Pampatike swamp. Adjoining the Spencer's land, North & c. crossing John's creek.

And there was one in Henrico Co.On Oct. 15 1698,”On the South side of Chickahominy swamp, being three small Islands. Begg. &c. on Queen's Cabin branch”. (Gideon Macom Jr. sold part of this land in 1704, he had inherited it from his father.)

Gideon Macon Jr.,( B. June 20, 1682 in New Kent Co). After the death of his father, Gideon Sr., in 1702, it was recorded in Henrico Co. Va., April 28 1704, that he sold “74 acres of land in Chickahominy Swamp, part of a tract granted to my father in 1698”, (from Henrico Co., Deed Bk. 1700-1704). (Land patent listed for Gideon Sr.).Gideon Jr. had to inherit the land before he sold it. Gideon Jr. was also on the New Kent Co., Virginia, Rent Rolls for 1704, “Gideon Meacon, 270 acres in New Kent Co”.

William, was one of Gideon's heirs with his older brother Gideon Jr., who was 12 years older. William inherited Mount Prospect Plantation on Macon Island. However, William was still very young and under the guardianship of his step father, Capt. West. In the land processioning records of St. Paul's parish in Hanover Co., it was stated that “Capt. West had the gout and could not be present, but William Macon would be of age in 3 years to attend”. William Macon was born on the Island (1694-1773), raised his children and died there.

William married Mary Hartwell. Mary was, ...“left 300 pounds, (English currency), at age 18 or day of marriage...”, by her uncle Henry Hartwell then in England, late of Virginia. Her uncle also left her land. And according to the Virginia Wills and Deeds Records of 1725, William and his wife Mary (Hartwell) Macon, sold 1210 acres of her inherited land. They sold the land to Robert Carter of Lancaster Co. Robert was known as “King” Carter.

William and Mary had eleven children, three, were their only sons, William Hartwell Macon Sr., the oldest son, who inherited the Mount Prospect Plantation on Macon Island, as the third owner, and Hartwell Macon, born in 1741, and Henry Macon, born in 1727, the two younger sons did not inherit. (Note to family, we are descendants of this Hartwell.)

When Hartwell Sr. was 30 years old,( married with children), in 1771, his father published in the Richmond newspapers that he, “William Macon, was not responsible for my son, Hartwell Macon's debts”. In another newspaper,William Macon said that “My son, Hartwell Macon has gotten into debt and that he will receive nothing more from his father”. This was on Oct. 17, 1771. Hartwell was 30 years old in 1771, and probably was in debt for an extended period of time for his father to resort to publishing this information in the newspapers.

Hartwell, his brother Henry, and their families, were in So. Carol. by 1789, according to court records of Fairfield Co. So. Carol., Hartwell Macon Sr. gives “power of attorney to Hartwell Macon Jr. to transact all his business in every state in the union not excepting No. Carol., to receive money, pay debts, make and receive conveyances, etc. Dated 13 Nov. 1789”. Wits: Gideon Macon, (Hartwell Sr.'s son), H. Macon (Henry, Hartwell's brother). Proved by Gideon Macon 15 Nov. 1789 before John Buchanan, J. P., and recorded 16 Nov. 1789. Fairfield Co., So. Carol., deed book A, 1785 to 1794.

William had many slaves on the Mount Prospect Plantation. The following is a list of a few of the slave children born and owned by William. (St. Peters Parish Records)

Mr. William Macon
“Beck a Negro girl belonging to Capt. Macon b Sept 29 1722
Rachel a Negra girl belonging to Capt. Macon b Nov 5 1722.
Jeny dau of Moll a Neg belonging to ye sd Macon b April 26 1717
Ann dau of Moll a Neg belonging to ye sd Macon b July 1 1717”

One of the above slaves named Moll may have belonged to Gideon, Williams father. According to St. Peters Parish Records, there was a Moll born in 1695, with Gideon as owner. Moll would have been 22 years old in 1717.

Mary died in 1770, and William died in 1773. Their headstone lists all of their children (“issue”). William and Mary's headstone was found in the family cemetery on Macon Island. It states:

“Here lie the bodies of
William Macon and Mary
his wife. He was born 4th
November 1694 and departed this
life in November 1773 in
the 79th year of his age.
She was born 18th June 1703
and departed this life 19th
of November 1770
And had issue
Ann, Martha, Mary, William, Henry,
Elizabeth, Sarah, Mary, Judy, Hartwell,
and Anna,of whom, two are
Interred near this place, Viz., Ann
who died 9th November 1736, age
16 years and Mary, who died 29th January 1733
age 9”.

The Third Macon Owner, William Hartwell Macon Sr.

The Mount Prospect Plantation on Macon Island, then passed to William's son, William Hartwell Macon Sr.(1725 to 1813). This William married Lucy Scott.

William Hartwell Macon Sr. was married with children, and had already established and built the Fairfield Plantation in Hanover Co., long before his father, William died in 1773. All of his children were born at Fairfield Plantation. He had bought a large tract of land that included two parcels, Fairfield and Powhite, earlier known as Old Quarter and Swamp Quarter. Both were in St. Paul's parish in Hanover Co. On Fairfield he built his home and raised his family.

On the Powhite tract he renamed the cemetery that was there, Macon Cemetery. According to a survey that was done in 1937, the cemetery was 50 feet wide and 100 feet long and shaded by many old trees. It is located 10 miles northeast of Richmond, Virginia (in Hanover Co.). In 1937 it was located, “out route #360, 7 miles from Richmond...to intersection of route #156, southeast on route #156, 2 miles to a private lane, south on private lane 1 mile”, it is located, “10 miles northeast of Richmond...” I was told that Fairfield and the Powhite Tract may be a subdivision of Richmond now, in the year 2010. William Hartwell Macon Sr. also established a Mill called “Mekenses” (Macon's) Mill at Powhite.

According to the 1790 Federal Census and the State Enumerations of 1784, This William had 3 whites, 1 dwelling, and 24 other buildings in New Kent County at Mt. Prospect Plantation. Also he had at Fairfield Plantation in Hanover County, 11 whites, and 91 blacks. All of the ancestors seem to have owned slaves in a big way, going back to William Macon, who died in 1684, the father of Gideon Sr. The slaves were inherited from generation to generation.

There were agencies that were springing up in Richmond for the hiring out of Negro slaves. This formed a large part of the “Real Estate Business” in the area. By the late 1700's there were about 100 tobacco factories in Richmond. Tobacco was a very large crop in Virginia.

The cemetery at Powhite had a very few headstones left after the Civil War. Three headstones were found for the Macon family, William Hartwell Macon Sr., His wife, Lucy, and one of his daughters, Elizabeth. The stones state:
“Here lies the body of
William Macon
He was born January 4 1725
And died November 25 1813”

“Here lies the body of
Lucy Macon
The wife of William Macon
She was born June 9 1737
And died December 1 1802”

“Here lies the body of
Elizabeth Nicholson
Daughter of William and Lucy Macon
She was born May 24th 1768
And died November 5 1802”


The Fourth Macon Owner, William Hartwell Macon Jr.

William Hartwell Macon Jr.(1740 to 1848), the oldest son of William listed above, inherited the Fairfield Plantation, the Powhite tract of land at Fairfield, as well as the Mount Prospect Plantation on Macon Island. He choose to live on Macon Island and sell Fairfield and the Powhite tract of land.

William Hartwell Macon Jr., after the death of his father, William, in 1813, sold the Powhite tract to Thomas Macon (1796-1851), (according to the survey of 1937).Thomas Macon married Mary Yancey, and “purchased land next to Capt. Wm. Macon, so. side of Pamcokey River”. (The Powhite tract). After various owners it was sold to a Dr. Gaines, who renamed the Mill, Gaines Mill. Apparently, there was later a Civil War battle fought there by that name.

William Hartwell Macon Jr. was married 3 times. Sarah Amblar (1760-1782), Hannah Selden (1760-1813), and Sarah Smith (1800-1857). He built another home (“a Mansion”), “on higher ground away from the swampy areas”, this was because of Malaria and other problems in the summer. It was called Mount Pleasant, however, it seems that both Plantations were referred to as Mount Prospect. Many planters had summer houses away from the rivers for these same reasons.

In 1810 he had purchased the land known as Butts Old Field. This was for 1000 acres. He also purchased more land around Mt. Prospect and part of the Brickhouse tract, for a total of 1040 acres he added to the Mt. Prospect Plantation around 1810.

William Hartwell Macon Jr. died in 1848, but his third wife, Sarah, lived there until her death in 1857. She was listed in the census of 1850 as 50 years of age, (1800-1857), (she lived 7 more years), she died having $23,360 worth of real estate.



The Fifth Macon Owner, Miles Cary Macon

William's son, Miles Cary Macon, (1791-1852), inherited the plantation next, but he could not take control of it, because he died in 1852, five years before his stepmother. Sarah, his stepmother was still living at Mt. Prospect until her death in 1857, as mentioned above.

Miles and family were living at Fairfield Plantation, his birth place, until his father, William, sold Fairfield Plantation. Then,according to Thomas Macon, his son, the family moved to Magnolia Farm, about two miles North of Richmond, and owned by the Nortons. Later, they moved to Rose Cottage owned by a Mr. Richardson. These moves were to be nearer to certain schools for their children.

Miles then bought “Auburn” Plantation, his wife's family home, about two and a half miles from the city of Richmond. Thomas was sent to live at Woodland Plantation, that his brother, Dr. William Hartwell Macon owned., so he could be nearer to a certain school, about three miles away. As the children got older they were sent away to boarding schools.

These moves were between the selling of Fairfield Plantation by William, Miles father, and 1852 when Miles himself died. He lived at places other than the family Plantations, because his stepmother was still living at Mount Prospect until 1857, so Miles did not live at the Mount Prospect Plantation. His wife, Francis, after the death of her husband, Miles in 1852, continued to live at the “Auburn” Plantation Miles had bought, but later moved to the city of Richmond.

Miles married Francis Mutter and had 4 sons among other children. Miles Macon, George Kennon Macon, Dr. William Hartwell Macon., and Thomas Joseph Macon (1839-1917).

1)This Thomas Macon wrote, “Life Gleanings”, a small book about his first hand account of life in early Virginia.

2) Miles Macon was the commander of the Fayette Artillery, Confederate States Army, (C. S. A)

3)George Kennon Macon, was a Cadet of the Virginia Military Institute when the Civil War started. He was wounded at the battle of New Market by a canister shot passing through his arm. Miles, recovering from typhoid fever went after him and took him to his mothers house in Richmond. George was born in 1846, at Henrico Co., Va., VMI Class of 1866, 2ed Corporal, Company A at New Market, a lawyer, and died in 1894, in Richmond, and was buried at Hollywood Cemetery. (C.S.A)

4)Dr. William Hartwell Macon, he studied to be a doctor in Philadelphia, where he had attended the Jefferson Medical College as an office student of Dr. Thomas C. Mutter, the president of the collage, and was a first cousin to his mother, Francis Mutter.


The Sixth Macon Owner, Dr. William Hartwell Macon.

After Miles death in 1852 and Sarah's death in 1857, Miles son, Dr. William Hartwell Macon was next to inherit the Mount Prospect Plantation, and Mount Pleasant.

He married, in 1848, Nora Criana Braxton.. Ingleside Plantation in Hanover Co. was his wife's family home.

He bought a Plantation called, Woodland, where he was living when his father and step mother died. Woodland was the Plantation, Thomas Macon, Dr. Macon's brother, was sent to live for awhile when Thomas was in school.

When Dr. Macon inherited Mount Prospect on Macon Island,and Mount Pleasant, he probably lived at both of them, including Woodland, at different times. He was living at Mount Prospect at times during the Civil War, according to his daughter, Mary.

The Seventh Macon Owner, Mary Sayre Macon Johnston

When he died, Dr. William Hartwell Macon passed Macon Island, the Mount Prospect Plantation, and Mount Pleasant, to his daughter, Mary Sayre Macon, who married Nathaniel Burwell Johnston and lived on the Island.

It was probably Mary and her husband, Nathaniel Johnston, who sold the Mt. Pleasant Plantation in 1908. Mt. Pleasant was set back from the “swampy” Island, “on higher ground”, as a summer house. This was the Plantation that was built by William Hartwell Macon Jr. in 1814. It was referred to as a “mansion”. It was part of the Mount Prospect Plantation.

The Eighth (Macon Family) Owners, J. Ambler Johnston, (With his brother, Miles Cary Macon Johnston)

Mary S. Macon Johnston left Macon Island to her sons, J. Ambler Johnston, (and Miles Cary Macon Johnston), Ambler Johnston was apparently still there in Jan., 1974, according to someone that was supposed to have been there.

I do not know what happened to the Island after 1974. It was probably sold off. It is too bad if this is the case, after almost 300 years of family ownership.



The following additional information for The Macon Plantation Essay was added, Dec. 12, 2010
It was contributed by Rusty Weber at RWNLK@aol.com. Thanks Rusty

Macon Island is still in the family. Mary Sayre Macon Johnston and Nathaniel Burwell Johnston had two sons, James Markham Ambler Johnston, 18 May 1885 to Feb. 1974, and Miles Cary Macon Johnston, 11 July 1888 to 2 Jan. 1963. They jointly inherited Macon Island.

The Ninth (Macon Family) Owners

The son of Miles Cary Macon Johnston, Miles Johnston Jr., he married Mary Garland (Cox), owns the Island now with one of his relatives. His son, Miles Johnston III, works the land with them. her his half and settled in Missouri.

One of his descendants, “William Hartwell Macon of Missouri died in 2006, but before his death, he shared some family stories with me about his great – grandparents, William Hartwell Macon and Nora Criena Braxton. He was the owner of Mount Prospect during the Civil War and was also an MD. Bill said that Nora actually left his grandfather for a while because she was so upset with him because he had given medical treatment to Yankee soldiers. They did eventually get back together, and his family still has the family Bible and still has some letters that Mary Custis Lee wrote to Nora during and after the war (Mary, Mrs. Robert E. Lee, was a cousin of William Hartwell Macon's). Bill said that at the time of her death, Nora was still so impassioned about the war that she was buried with a Confederate flag and a photograph of Robert E. Lee.”

Bib:

William and Mary Quarterly, Series 1, Vol. 6, P. 33.
Library of Virginia Digital Collections, Old Macon Graveyard Land Survey Report by Evans, 1937.
Old New Kent County (Virginia), Some account of the Planters..., Vol 1, by Harris M.D.
Life Gleanings, by Thomas Joseph Macon
Genealogies of Virginia Families from Tyler's Quarterly Historical. p. 724.
Genealogical Gleanings in England, Vol.1, by Fitz and Waters, p. 313-14.
Seldens of Virginia and Allied Families, by Allaben, 1911.
St. Peter's Parish register.
The 1790 Federal Census
The Virginia state Enumerations of 1784.
The Record of Burton Parish Church” by Goodwin
The Virginia Land Office of Patents and Grants.
The Virginia Archives Division, of Wills and Deeds. 1716 to 1730.
The South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research, Vol. XVI, Num.2, Spring, 1988.
The New Kent County Rent Rolls of Virginia, 1704

-------------------------------------------------


The below info is from “LIFE GLEANINGS”
Compiled by T. J. MACON

Richmond, VA.
1913
W. H. ADAMS, PUBLISHER
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA

[Bruced Washburn’s note: I am including the info from this book in William Macon’s bio here because I am ASSUMING that T. J. Macon was his grandson]:

CHAPTER I.

The author of these pages first saw the light of day at the family home of his father, Mr. Miles Cary Macon, called "Fairfield," situated on the banks of that historic river, the "Chicahominy," in the good old County of Hanover, in Virginia. My grandfather, Colonel William Hartwell Macon, started each of his sons on the voyage of life with a farm, and the above was allotted to my respected parent. Belonging to the place, about one or two miles from the dwelling, was a grist mill known as "Mekenses," and how the name of "Macon" could have been corrupted to "Mekenses," is truly unaccountable, yet such as the case. The City of Richmond was distant about eight miles to the South. This old homestead passed out of the Macon family possession about seventy years ago, and a Mr. Overton succeeded my father in the ownership of "Fairfield" and the mill. Later a Doctor Gaines purchased it. My highly respected parents were the fortunate possessors of a large and flourishing family of ten children, all of whom were born at "Fairfield."

The Macon manor house was situated just on the edge of the famous trucking section of Hanover County, which agricultural characteristic gave its soil an extensive reputation for the production of the celebrated and highly- prized melons and sweet potatoes of Hanover, known to

Page 6
Eastern Virginia for their toothsomness and great size. This fine old plantation was surrounded by country estates belonging to Virginia families, who were very sociable, cultured and agreeable people.

... I was the youngest of the family...

CHAPTER II.

At the time I am writing about, the life of the Virginia farmer was one to be much desired, for he was a baron in his realm, was lord of all he surveyed, and yielded no obeisance to any one, but to his Maker and his country. The dark shadows of coming dire events had not then cast their war-like omens ahead. The question of the Missouri Compromise, the admission of Kansas into the sisterhood of the States under the Lecompton Convention, the decision in the Dred Scott case, the political issues and measures which were the precursors of the great war between the States had not yet reached Congress. Everything that could render life pleasant was vouchsafed the country gentleman and planter, and his family about three-quarters of a century ago.

Our family moved from old Fairfield to Magnolia farm, only about two miles north of Richmond, which place was then owned by the Nortons, and it was a quiet, pleasant home "far away from the madding crowd" in a sociable and agreeable neighborhood; it is at the present time owned by the "Hartshorne" Colored Female Institute and now is included within the corporate limits of the city of Richmond, Va. How rapidly the wheel of time brings changes in our surroundings. My father's children are advancing in years, the older ones are sent off to boarding schools, my oldest brother had just returned from Philadelphia, where he had attended the Jefferson Medical College as an office student of Dr. Thomas C. Mutter, the president of the college, who was first cousin of my mother - her maiden name was Frances Mutter.

From Magnolia we moved to "Rose Cottage," owned by a Mr. Richardson, the object in this move being to be near "Washington and Henry" Academy, a boarding and day school carried on by a Mr. and Mrs. Dunton; she was in charge of the small boys and the girls, while her husband taught the large boys. I was in Mrs. Dunton's department, being but a small chap, and as to whether I learned anything at this time it is a matter of considerable doubt. My mother furnished six pupils to this institution. The principals would come over to "Rose Cottage" two or three times per month, bringing their boarders with them, which visits they appeared to enjoy greatly as a good supper, with a large and shady yard to play in, was certainly well calculated to afford mirth and pleasure to both old and young. A Mr. Osborne, a Presbyterian minister, boarded at the academy, being a unique character and one of the

Page 10
best men to be found anywhere; he formed the plan of teaching the scholars, young and old, the catechism of the Presbyterian Church, and all those who committed it to memory received a nice book as a prize. The climax of the scheme was an offer of a grand prize to any scholar that would repeat the whole of it without a hitch or halt. The children were thoroughly inoculated with Presbyterianism. The final trial of reciting, or memorizing, the catechism came off at the residence of Mr. Thomas Gardner. The contest was one long to be remembered, a Miss Fannie Shelton scoring the first honor, and Miss Newell Gardner the second. The supper provided for this happy occasion was a first class one in every respect. The best that a well- stocked farm house could produce, both in substantiate and nicknacks, such for instance, as broiled chicken, roast lamb and barbecued pig, with dessert of ice cream, yellow cake and pies in abundance; it was in short one of the finest "lay-outs" that I ever saw, and being an appreciative youngster I did ample justice to it indeed, and fairly revelled in the many good eatables so generously spread before us, and to this day I remember it with pleasure. "Rose Cottage" was truly a delightful home. The never-failing wheel of time was turning fast, and the water of life that once passed over it will never again turn it. We were all growing fast as we advanced in years. At this time my father bought a place on Nine Mile Road, about two and a half miles from the city, it was named "Auburn," and to it we moved bag and baggage.

Just as with "Fairfield" and Magnolia," we found hospitable neighbors, and genial intercourse was conspicuous. Among them were Colonel Sherwin McRae and family, a Mrs. Gibson, Mr. Tinsley Johnson, Mr. Galt Johnson, and many other well known families, nearly all of whom have

Page 11
now moved away or have passed to the other side of the river. Mr. William Galt Johnson lived about a quarter of a mile from us, and there was a considerable intercourse between the two families. "Galt," as he was called...

My mother determined to send me to live with my eldest brother, Doctor William H. Macon, who had recently married Miss Nora C. Braxton, the daughter of Mr. Carter Braxton, of "Ingleside," Hanover County, the owner of the celebrated plantation "New Castle," situated on the Pamunkey River. The name of my brother's home was "Woodland," about three miles below the well-known tavern at Old Church. The reason of my being sent to live with him was to be convenient to enter the school kept

Page 12
by a Count Larry, one of the best teachers of his day and time. The school house was distant about three miles from my brother's place, and not too far away for a little boy to walk at that time. I was duly enrolled as a day scholar in Count Larry's establishment, which consisted of an unpretentious structure, about thirty feet square, with two doors, one for entry and the other for exit, and was lighted by two windows with which to admit the sunshine and fresh air in the summer time, and to shut out the "cold chilly winds of December." The school was composed of both boys and girls, and the Count sat in a large wooden chair, with a table at his side similar to those now seen in a modern dairy lunch room in the cities.

CHAPTER IV.

My brother, Miles Macon, afterwards commander of the Fayette Artillery, Confederate States Army, joined me at "Woodland" and became a scholar in our school; he was my senior by two years. Our country life there was very pleasant, for on Saturdays we would hunt birds all day, as my brother owned a fine pointer dag named "Roscoe," and we were hunting on "Spring Garden," owned by Judge Meredith, it being about seven miles from our place, when the old dog broke down from the infirmities of age and Miles and I carried him home on our shoulders, it being his last appearance in the fields that he had so successfully hunted, for he died soon afterwards.

Dr. William Macon, my brother, about this time came into possession of the Mount Prospect plantation in New Kent County, on the Pamunkey River, left to him by our grandfather, Colonel William Hartwell Macon, it being then one of the finest farms on the river; it adjoined the famous White House aforementioned, which latter plantation was inherited and occupied later by General William H. Fitzhugh flee, son of the famous General Robert E. Lee, of Confederate fame.

The York- River railroad passed through a portion of the "Mt. Prospect farm." A noted feature of the place was its very large and beautiful garden, almost every flower and plant known to Eastern Virginia florists was to be found there, and considerable expense had been made to render it a veritable Garden of Eden; and then, alas! when the great strife began between the North and the South, and our beloved old State became the battleground of the contending hosts of soldiers of both sides, and the Federal army, under General McClellan, advanced up the peninsula from Fort Monroe the farm became the camping ground, and his cavalry was picketted in that lovely spot, amid the almost priceless roses and violets, and needless to add that when those horsemen left it was a pitiable scene of "horrid war's desolating effects, as hardly a trace of its former beauty and vision of refinement remained.

A gentleman, Colonel Grandison Crump, taught school near the place, and I was made a scholar of his; it was quite like that of Count Larry's, except that the Colonel had no girls in his school. He sat is the same kind of armchair, and made and trimmed quill pens in the very same

Page 17
way. He was a most excellent teacher and I fairly buckled down to hard study, and as a consequence learned more then ever before, or indeed afterwards, at school. Our teacher was not a young man, as he was near sixty years of age...

Well, after attending Colonel Crumps' school for three years, when he closed for the summer vacation I bid farewell to his excellent tutorship. There were many quite pleasant associations connected with my school days there; I was considered one of his best boys; I packed up my few belongings there and returned to Auburn, my mother's home. My respected father died in the year 1852, and my mother then carried on the farming operations under the supervision of our servant Israel as her head man and overseer, who was one of the most efficient and faithful negroes I ever knew, performing his duties fully and satisfactorily to his mistress as manager of the hands.

Two of my sisters were then married, Sister Anne to Mr. Peyton Johnston, the senior member of the drug house of P. Johnston & Brothers, of Richmond; my other sister, Betty, married the Rev. Dr. Alexander Martin, of the Presbyterian Church in Danville, Va. Probably no minister in that denomination had a higher reputation for pulpit oratory; he preached with force and effect, and set an example of a pure, unselfish, Christian life.

After consulting the wishes of her single daughters my good mother decided to move to Richmond. She therefore rented a nice roomy house in a pleasant street in the city, and then a new leaf in the book of life was turned for me, as I of course continued to live with the family, but an era, or epoch in my journey of life now confronted me, as I was about to start to work to earn my own bread and meat. I therefore duly made application to the firm of Parker,

Page 21
Nimms & Co. for a clerkship in their establishment, and the senior partner told me to call in a few days for an answer, which I accordingly did in due time and received a favorable one, and in a few days I began my life's work. I remained with that firm six years and only left in 1861 to join, or rather to go with the First Company Richmond Howitzers into the great war between the States, being a member before the same strife began, having joined in the year 1859 when the company ...

CHAPTER XI.

A unique feature was the agencies for hiring out negro hands and servants, it forming a large part of the business of the real estate men. Richmond was then said to have one hundred tobacco factories in active operation.

My memory reverts to an interesting event in the year 1860, when Edward, the Prince of Wales, of the Royal family of Great Britain, visited Richmond, coming here from Washington with his retinue who were entertained at the old Exchange and Ballard House - then in its prime. The Prince stayed over Sunday and attended church at Saint Paul's. Doctor Minnegerode was then the rector of the parish, and he preached a good practical sermon for the distinguished guests. I remember well seeing the

Page 30
Prince, who was then a beardless youth, of a good figure and looks, he returned to the Capital City the next day, pleased with his trip; it was an epoch in the history of Virginia, socially speaking. Another incident was the lecture delivered here by Mr. Thackery, the great novelist, at the Athenaeum, which building was then just in the rear of the Broad Street Methodist Church, the subject of the lecture was the "Georges," and it was a chaste and interesting address, full of anecdotes, with a vein of sarcasm interspersed throughout.

Another lecture about this time was that of the Hon. Edward Everett, delivered at the old African Church; the subject was General George Washington. He was lecturing under the auspices of the Mount Vernon Association for the purchase of that place from its owners. The Mount Vernon papers which were then published by Mr. Bowner in the New York Ledger, were edited by him, and this address by him here was a literary treat, as was everything emanating from his cultivated mind; the church was filled with a highly appreciative audience, and all went home well pleased.

The local politics were to some extent interesting, as almost every man discussed them in public. The African Church was used on Sundays as a negro meeting house for worship, and during the week for political gatherings by the white people, it being the largest in town. The colored people were of course paid for the use of their church building. When a person announced his candidacy for any office in the gift of the people, he was requested to define his position and views on the questions of the day. For instance when the subject of a free bridge between Richmond and Manchester over the James River was debated

Page 31
the people were called upon to express their ideas pro and con in the old African Church. 
MACON, William (I3080)
 
42 1 Adventurers of Purse & Person, 4th ed., p. 367, fn 15, "Henrico Co. Orphans Court Bk. 1677-1739, p. 2, "Account of cattle & horses belonging to the orphans of Mr. William Branch dec'd., & Mr. Baugh dec'd. presented by Mr. Abell Gower," which names William and John Branch, Mary and Priscilla Baugh. Mary married John Cox; Priscilla married William Farrar."

p. 369, John's wife Martha granted probate of her husband's will, now lost, 2 April 1688. 
Branch, John (I9461)
 
43 1 Adventurers of Purse & Person, 4th ed., p. 367, fn 15, "Henrico Co. Orphans Court Bk. 1677-1739, p. 2, "Account of cattle & horses belonging to the orphans of Mr. William Branch dec'd., & Mr. Baugh dec'd. presented by Mr. Abell Gower," which names William and John Branch, Mary and Priscilla Baugh. Mary married John Cox; Priscilla married William Farrar." Branch, William (I9460)
 
44 1 Adventurers of Purse & Person, 4th ed., p. 367, fn 15, "Henrico Co. Orphans Court Bk. 1677-1739, p. 2, "Account of cattle & horses belonging to the orphans of Mr. William Branch dec'd., & Mr. Baugh dec'd. presented by Mr. Abell Gower," which names William and John Branch, Mary and Priscilla Baugh. Mary married John Cox; Priscilla married William Farrar." Branch, William (I9459)
 
45 1 Adventurers of Purse & Person, 4th ed., p. 367, fn 15, "Henrico Co. Orphans Court Bk. 1677-1739, p. 2, "Account of cattle & horses belonging to the orphans of Mr. William Branch dec'd., & Mr. Baugh dec'd. presented by Mr. Abell Gower," which names William and John Branch, Mary and Priscilla Baugh. Mary married John Cox; Priscilla married William Farrar." Baugh, Mary (I9458)
 
46 1 Adventurers of Purse & Person, 4th, p. 730.

Henrico Co., VA, Wills & Deed, 1725-37, p. 466, Will of Richard Cox of Henrico Parish. To son John, all my outward land, 105 acres, where he lives. To son Henry, all my land on north side of Cornelius' Cr., 500 acres, only I give my wife Mary 100 acres of it where the house is. To daughter Mary Fore [Faure], items. To daughter Elizabeth Hutchens, a cow. To grandson Hickerson Cox, 105 acres where my son Richard Cox lives. To son Richard, 1 shilling. To daughter Obedience Perkins, 1 shilling. To daughter Edith Wintler [Whitlow?], my books & spectals [sic]. To wife Mary, items and to be executor. Dated 13 July 1734. Wit: Michael Turpin, Michael Turpin, James Whitler. Recorded Feb. 1734 [Weisiger abstract] 
Cox, Richard (I9457)
 
47 1 Adventurers of Purse & Person, 4th, p. 730. Trent, Mary (I9463)
 
48 1 NAME William /GROOMER/
1 SEX M
1 BIRT
2 DATE 20 MAR 1787
2 PLAC Kentucky
1 DEAT
2 DATE 2 FEB 1858
1 BURI
2 PLAC New Hope Cemetary, Washington Twp., Clay County, Missouri
2 SOUR Missouri Genealogical Records and Abstracts, Volume 3 (Allen Co.
977.8
3 CONT Ed2m) - age 70 years 10 m 12 days
1 FAMS @F7@
1 NOTE 1850 Census - Daviess Co., MO - 63, M, Farmer, $1000, Kentucky
0 @I15@ INDI
1 NAME Elizabeth W. /BURTON/
1 SEX F
1 BIRT
2 DATE 30 DEC
1792
2 PLAC Garrard, Kentucky
2 NOTE DOB also reported as 28 Dec 1791
2 SOUR LDS 8311505-43 1395523

Timeline from Bob Burton of Gainesville:

3/28/1810: Marriage of William Gromer and Elizabeth Burton. Recorded in Garrard Co, KY Marriages And Wills 1796-1851. Bride's father = Allen Burton. Bondsman = John W Crosswhite *Remember Sherrod Burton married to Rebecca Crosswhite*

1810: William Gromer appears as head of a family in Wilson Co, KY census, page 210. Enumerated are M16-26, F26-45 plus M26-45.

1820: Wm Gromer appears as head of a family in Wilson Co, KY census, page 144. Enumerated are M26-45, F26-45, M<10, 3F<10 plus 3 slaves.

1830: William Gromer appears as head of a family in Garrard Co, KY census, page 218. Enumerated are M40-50, F30- 40, F15-20, M10-15, F10-15, 2F5-10, 2M<5.

1840: Wm Groomer appears as head of a family in Clay Co, MO census, page 024. Enumerated are M50-60, F40-50, 2F15-20, 2M10-15.

1850: William (M63-KY) and Elizabeth (F59-KY) Groomer appear as heads of a family in Washington Township in Clay Co, MO census, page 369 B. Children: Garrett (M21-KY). 
Gromer, William (I5223)
 
49 1 NAME William /GROOMER/
1 SEX M
1 BIRT
2 DATE 20 MAR 1787
2 PLAC Kentucky
1 DEAT
2 DATE 2 FEB 1858
1 BURI
2 PLAC New Hope Cemetary, Washington Twp., Clay County, Missouri
2 SOUR Missouri Genealogical Records and Abstracts, Volume 3 (Allen Co.
977.8
3 CONT Ed2m) - age 70 years 10 m 12 days
1 FAMS @F7@
1 NOTE 1850 Census - Daviess Co., MO - 63, M, Farmer, $1000, Kentucky
0 @I15@ INDI
1 NAME Elizabeth W. /BURTON/
1 SEX F
1 BIRT
2 DATE 30 DEC
1792
2 PLAC Garrard, Kentucky
2 NOTE DOB also reported as 28 Dec 1791
2 SOUR LDS 8311505-43 1395523

Timeline from Bob Burton of Gainesville:

3/28/1810: Marriage of William Gromes and Elizabeth Burton. Recorded in Garrard Co, KY Marriages And Wills 1796-1851
Bride's father = Allen
Bondsman = John W Crosswhite *Remember Sherrod Burton married to Rebecca Crosswhite*

1810: William Gromer appears as head of a family in Wilson Co, KY census, page 210. Enumerated are M16-26, F26-45 plus M26-45.

1820: Wm Gromer appears as head of a family in Wilson Co, KY census, page 144. Enumerated are M26-45, F26-45, M<10, 3F<10 plus 3 slaves.

1830: William Gromer appears as head of a family in Garrard Co, KY census, page 218. Enumerated are M40-50, F30- 40, F15-20, M10-15, F10-15, 2F5-10, 2M<5.

1840: Wm Groomer appears as head of a family in Clay Co, MO census, page 024. Enumerated are M50-60, F40-50, 2F15-20, 2M10-15.

1850: William (M63-KY) and Elizabeth (F59-KY) Groomer appear as heads of a family in Washington Township in Clay Co, MO census, page 369 B. Children: Garrett (M21-KY). 
Burton, Elizabeth W. (I5222)
 
50 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I6520)
 

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